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1. End of the World Party: Just in
$14.99 $10.95 list($18.98)
2. EnRoute
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3. West Coast Boogaloo
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4. That's What I Say
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5. A Show of Hands
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6. Friday Afternoon in the Universe
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7. Soul Serenade
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8. Friends Seen & Unseen
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9. Steady Groovin'
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10. All Kooked Out!
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11. Combustication
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12. A Go Go
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13. Uninvisible
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14. Crazyhorse Mongoose
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15. Live
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16. Doin' Something
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17. Steady Groovin'
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18. Joyful Noise
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19. Up All Night
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20. Ruckus

1. End of the World Party: Just in Case (Dig)
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Asin: B0002QO4B8
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 1268
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Amazon.com

With each successive album, Medeski Martin & Wood have become harder to pin down. Having long ago transcended their soulful organ-groove basics to enter a more expansive world of snappy beats and backbeats, eerie atmospheric effects, post-lounge riffing, and the occasional jazz overture, they occupy their own category. Produced by the Dust Brothers' John King (Beck's Odelay, the Beastie Boys' Paul's Boutique), End of the World Party (Just in Case) is an agreeably varied effort, ranging from the spacey effects and Middle Eastern taint of "Bloody Oil" (on which bassist Chris Wood lays down the lumber) to the sassy electric funk of "Sasa" (one of four tracks featuring guitarist Marc Ribot) to the wordless voice effects of the jaunty title track. As ever, John Medeski is equally at home referencing post-bop piano aces like Herbie Hancock, getting down on churning Hammond organ, and making like Stevie Wonder with his "Superstition"-style synth. Unlike some MMW records, this one wastes not: all 12 tracks clock in at around the four- or five-minute mark, and they flow together with consummate ease. --Lloyd Sachs ... Read more


2. EnRoute
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Asin: B0001EJ7IQ
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 3050
Average Customer Review: 4.17 out of 5 stars
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With the live EnRoute, recorded at New York's Blue Note, guitarist John Scofield returns from the jam-band wars in challenging high style, leading a trio for the first time on record in more than 20 years. With his strong blues and funk sensibility, Scofield has always been the jazz guitarist most likely to succeed among rock listeners, and fans from both camps will be drawn to this purer improvisational enterprise. Teamed here with longtime drumming associate Bill Stewart and veteran bassist Steve Swallow (who was featured on those early-'80s trio albums), he's still jamming, but there's a sharpness of focus and a locked-in intensity among the musicians that you rarely encounter in jam-band settings--including his own. Emptying out his bag of much-imitated tricks--the sighing pedal tones, slab-like chords, shimmering lyrical lines, and controlled screams--Scofield romps through the bop classic, "Wee," and delivers a diaphanous reading of "Alfie." The album also features a pair of remakes: "Name That Tune," Swallow's bounding remake of Duke Ellington's "Perdido," and the leader's strutting "Over Big Top," based on "Bigtop" from his 1995 album, Groove Elation. From whatever perspective you choose, it's Scofield's best album since Time on My Hands, his 1990 quartet date with saxist Joe Lovano. --Lloyd Sachs ... Read more

Reviews (12)

5-0 out of 5 stars a reference-standard live recording
I've been a Scofield fan for as long as I can remember and see him live as often as possible. That said, and much as I've enjoyed his funk outings, this is the best thing he's released since his days with Joe Lovano in the band. This is a telepathically tight trio, and Scofield's solos here make it clear he's one of the greatest jazz guitarists ever. Lots of risk-taking, tremendous creativity and chops, with a range that moves from Bop to blues to New Orleans funk - often all in the same song. Truly a master at the top of his game.

5-0 out of 5 stars MAN! That guy can play!
Scofield fans rejoice! This is probably his best album in years. It's live, so we actually get to hear Old Man Sco play, and play, and play, and, well, you get the idea. The energy is great, the band is solid, and Scofiled's solos go on for days. Usually, in the studio, the guitarist is more cautious. He keeps his solos relatively short and he doesn't come up with as many crazy voicings and riffs that fans have seen in his live shows. That is not the case here. He comes up with so much off the wall stuff that it blows my mind. Also, we have the unusual treat of hearing him play some high tempo bop. I have most of his albums and I never realized he could play and sound so good playing that fast. I agree with the other reviewer that Swallow's playing is a little too low key, but it isn't a big deal. Bottom line: if you dig sco, you'll dig this; if you were never really sure about sco's chops, you'll be pleasantly supprised; and if you're just looking for a kickin' record, you've found it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great cd
I saw the later show both nights, and couldn't believe what I was hearing. Scofield truely took it to a new level for me. I had been into his work with MMW and jamabands but I didn't know he had it in him. This show prooves he does, Scofield is truely a jazz musician.

4-0 out of 5 stars Staggers, but remains interesting
As much as I'd like to pretend it was, this is definitely not something that all newer fans of Scofield will enjoy. There are definately moments on this cd that amaze me every time I hear them, but there are also moments where Mr. Scofield goes a little too far outside the lines for too long for my tastes. This cd gets four stars for all the amazing moments and for the fact that the groove is a constant that Scofield has made his trademark. If you are new to straight ahead trio work or come to Scofield by way of his funkier cds, you might want to take this cd into consideration with caution. Make no mistake that at times this album has hard bop written all over it, but make no mistake that Scofield is one of the best guitarists that has ever graced jazz/fusion.

3-0 out of 5 stars 3 stars for being alive
Aside from that, in the light of the genious of Wes, VanEps, and Breau, I'll forgo the current trends in jazz guitar. ... Read more


3. West Coast Boogaloo
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Asin: B0000060BM
Catlog: Music
Average Customer Review: 4.92 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (13)

5-0 out of 5 stars Calculated Liberty
This band is all about juxtaposition. In West Coast Boogaloo, the Allstars produce an incredibly tight and unified groove, all the while peppering it with badassedly loose and liberated abandon. Bouncy, flowing basslines, coupled with the light touch and tasty hi-hats workings of Zak Najor on drums lay the ground work for this disc. Sprinkled on top are lively horns, simple but effective guitars, and hot keyboards. Karl Denson leads the group, donating mind-blowing flute solos and soulful sax runs. The only drawback to this band is when Denson attempts to sing. Each member gets the opportunity to solo in almost every song, giving a free, fresh and 'flying by the seat of your pants' feeling. Tight, free, big, funky, exciting, fast - you choose. This album is the band's crowning achievement and is not be missed.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Greyboys At Their Finest
In a time when so much music seems processed and overproduced, the Greyboy Allstars offer fresh, funky, and downright mesmerizing relief here. Along with the help of ex-JB Horn's member Fred Wesley the Greyboys jam acid-jazz style better than anyone around. Each member showcases his outstanding talents on this album, and Karl Denson on sax provides more proof that he is one of the finest players in the jazz world bar none. buy this CD and strap yourself down, or you may be blown away.

5-0 out of 5 stars Smooth as butter, baby
Bass lines JUMP out of your speaker, into your ears and send message to brain that says: "Conitnue to shake booty generously from side to side." Boogaloo guitars and Rhodes pianos lightin' it up. Causes head to rock front to back, right along with Zak Najor, quite possibly the sickest drummer around. And FRED WESLEY, folks! The Man Is Trombone. He plays effortlessly. Struggle-free lick trading with Karl Denson. If you have any appreciation for thoughtful AND fun music, this is the disc for you. Wouldn't consider this jam band. Widespread Panic is a jam band. If you like being bored to tears, buy thier stuff. If you like Herbie Hancock's funkier stuff, Galactic, Corduroy, The JB's, Tower of Power, etc. you'll love this session.

5-0 out of 5 stars What's with the Flute you ask?
It is not often that I am compelled to review an album, but I just had to give this one its props. This collection of studio cuts is as close to a live performance as it gets. Throw in some Fred Wesley (how many other famous trombone players can you name? Nuff said!) and it is just straight up groovin'. Karl Denson's flute breakdowns on this CD are the closest thing to Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson that I've heard. This guy rips on the flute (and sax). Every track on this cd is good. Highly recommended for any fan of Boogaloo!

5-0 out of 5 stars A True Classic
Boogie beats plus serious musical chops plus a few well-chosen funk covers plus Fred Wesley = A TRUE CLASSIC. Many have given props to Karl Denson (and deservedly so), but let us not forget the masterful guitar work of Mike Andrews a.k.a. Elgin Park. If you dig this record, check out the follow-up A Town Called Earth. Not as complete and concise as this one, but many of the tunes capture the West Coast Boogaloo and take it to new places, too. ... Read more


4. That's What I Say
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Asin: B0009299KQ
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 1259
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Although sure to be criticized for cashing in on the Ray Charles bandwagon, jazzman John Scofield’s 2005 tribute release is also one of the most varied yet successful albums in the guitarist’s extensive catalog. Shifting from a big band/multi-vocalist approach for the classic "What’d I Say" featuring an all-star lineup of Dr. John, Warren Haynes, Aaron Neville, John Mayer and Mavis Staples trading verses (they all also take solo vocals on other tracks), along with longtime Charles saxist David "Fathead" Newman, to the lone guitar rendition of "Georgia on my Mind" that closes the disc, Scofield celebrates both Charles’ music and his eclectic approach to it. The stripped down instrumental version of "Crying Time" with only funereal organ accompaniment is perfectly offset by the following gospelized reading of "I Can’t Stop Loving You," brought home by Mavis Staples’ explosive vocal. Teen throb John Mayer acquits himself admirably on vocals and guitar, singing and trading licks with Scofield on a rugged "I Don’t Need No Doctor," and Dr. John brings New Orleans soul on a greasy "Talkin’ Bout You"/"I Got a Woman" medley.The horn section gets a workout on powerfully swinging instrumental takes of "Hit the Road Jack" and "Let’s Go Get Stoned." Scofield’s quivering solos show moderation yet convey the music’s R&B roots, even when he’s turning up the heat on a rousingMedeski, Martin and Wood -styled, acid laced "Sticks and Stones." Producer/drummer Steve Jordan finds the perfect vibe between jazz and R&B, and keeps the guest vocalists from stealing the spotlight. He provides the ideal framework for John Scofield’s fiery yet restrained playing and a fitting tribute to a jazz/R&B icon.--Hal Horowitz ... Read more


5. A Show of Hands
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Asin: B000002030
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 4410
Average Customer Review: 4.62 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (39)

5-0 out of 5 stars Passing the torch
I don't know that I would necessarily agree in calling Vic the "Jaco of funk." Not that he is not deserving of such praise, Jaco was indeed "funky" from Weather Report to the early solo stuff. But Victor, like Jaco pushed musicians and critics to the wall and screamed at them to take notice. Victor is a 2nd generation pioneer in the truest sense of the word. From his "double-thumb" technique to his subtle laid-back grooves on Flecktones albums, to his absolutely virtuosic soloing ability (I usually take offense to the use of the word virtuoso but in this case is entirely justified) he has moved a "backup" instrument to a forefront, vanguard position and not without absolute class and flourish.

Victor Wooten is the greatest bass player alive and is matched only by his charm and modesty in person. This album is a showcase of bass acrobatics, simple-time groove, and the power of potential which the mainstream has decided to overlook.

5-0 out of 5 stars Victor Wooten
Before I listened to this album, I thought an album of only bass would be cumbersome. At first, I felt it was. But after a few more listens, this album started to grow on me. Victor's playing ability is amazing. He is one of, if not the best bassist I have heard. He also can craft highly listenable and catchy songs that show off his abilities. My favorites are "More Love", "U Can't Hold No Groove", "Classical Thump" and "Overjoyed".

2-0 out of 5 stars Uninspiring
Ok here's the deal. Victor Wooten is without a doubt one of the world's top bassists today. But simply put, I find this album little more than a novelty. Sure, Victor showcases some amazing chops and great tone throughout the album. However I find I tire of this album easily. His compositions are distinctly "bass" compositions, which is not a compliment, even coming from me, a bass player. I could never see a band playing any of them. The best track here is the medley of standards. Another problem with this cd are the annoying radio interludes, leaving you with barely half of the "real" tracks you expected. Granted, this is a very interesting album to listen to, but I don't like interesting music. I like passionate music, and I find little of it here. If you want to here some great technical bass playing, buy this album. If you want to here some great music, look elsewhere.

5-0 out of 5 stars He's pretty damn good
Victor Wooten pushes the limits of what a bass can do. This album is his way of demonstrating what he can do with just 4 strings. Who the hell would think that he could make someone like me ask "How many bassists are playing on this track?" ! Even before this record, Victor had taken thumping to a new level. He was able to surprise us all by pushing that even further in A Show of Hands. Pure instrumental and musical genius.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wow! Incredible! Amazing!
If you haven't heard who Victor Wooten is you are probably one of the many masses of music followers who are stuck on the sounds of modern day pop music and have no real love for truely superlative music outside of catchy hook lines or nicely choreographed dance sequences. Music that will be forgotten very easily 5 to 10 years down the road if not tommorow.Victor is not one of those artists. Luckily youve made it to this web page and actually are discovering for yourselves outside of mainstream "Popular" music what REAL music is. Music afficianados and bass enthusiast will be talking about him and learning from him for as long as music is around. Its that simple. The guy probably hears the words WOW, INCREDIBLE, and AMAZING every time he picks up his bass to play a song. He is that good! Victor Wooten falls in the category of someone who is at the top of thier particular field. Like any artist who pushes the limit, few things can really be defined in what they do. You can say its this or that but what it really is is something that is not easily put into words. This particular CD showcases that talent for everyone to hear and appreciate, something that really is a pleasure to listen to and enjoy. A show of hands draws its base from a wide range of musical styles so it is hard to say what really is being played here. Funk is the main word that comes to mind but the songs on the CD are much more than that. Bluesy, Jazzy, throw in even a touch of Gospel Music if you will and a splatter of classical. This has a bit of it all. The version of "overjoyed" is probably the most beautiful version of the song I have ever heard and "classical thump" is just numbing to try to follow if you play any kind of intstrument. Very easy listening and a joy to stumble upon an artist that I will be following for years to come. I recommend this CD to anyone that has even the faintest love of music. Its not for everyone, but everyone should hear it. ... Read more


6. Friday Afternoon in the Universe
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Asin: B00000322D
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 3878
Average Customer Review: 4.91 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

They may attract Sufi-dancing Deadheads to their rock-club shows and they may have connections to lower Manhattan's art-music scene, but when you get right down to it, Medeski Martin & Wood are just a jazz organ trio. Organist John Medeski, drummer Billy Martin, and bassist Chris Wood don't work a whole lot differently from the old Jimmy Smith Trio; they get a good groove going, add a catchy hook and then improvise changes on both the rhythm and the melody. They may take more liberties than Smith ever has, but that familiar combination of a thick organ sound and funky drum patterns is still the core. The third Medeski Martin & Wood album, Friday Afternoon in the Universe, is the best reflection yet of the trio's live show, for 13 of the 15 tracks feature no guests, just the interaction among the three principals. And that interaction has been honed by three years of extensive roadwork into a genuine give-and-take. There's no parade of disconnected solos here, no fast, flashy playing for its own sake; the three players move as one through impressionistic, atmospheric patches into driving funk grooves and then off onto spacey tangents. Medeski plays some piano and synthesizer, but everything he plays has the thickened textures associated with a B-3 organ--thick enough to make three pieces more than sufficient. --Geoffrey Himes ... Read more

Reviews (11)

5-0 out of 5 stars ON THE MOVE WITH MEDESKI MARTIN & WOOD
"Friday Afternoon in the Universe" would be a pretty good answer to the question, "What time is it?" Actually, it's the title to Medeski Martin & Wood's third album, and like the title, the work as a whole is an expansive embrace of genres and styles. Literally postmodern to the hilt, "Friday Afternoon..." is a carnivalesque mix of samba, mambo, rumba, gypsy, "pirate" and all other kinds of music, and it is the predictable sound of MMW that brings them all together into a giant collage of galactic monkey funk. My favorite piece is only about a minute and a half long: Featuring a kid who has seemingly wandered into the studio with his plastic raygun (could it be? Kenny G?) serious jazz listeners will be jarred as MMW is "attacked" when the kid fires it. Then the band, in a masterful group improvisation, responds by imitating the noise. The kid fires again, but this time the sound's different. Again the response. Although this is the kind of thing any dad in a garage band might do with his son, the piece hearkens back to the call-and-response roots of the blues thrust as it is straight into the sci fi future. What's amazing is how well these three players know one another. They read each other like books, and BAM! They're on the move.

4-0 out of 5 stars Interesting
I feel out of my element here, since I don't know a whole lot about jazz. Nevertheless, MMW is fantasitic. When I first bought this album, I thought it was... alright. Chubb Sub was, and still is, my favorite. It would just bother me how Medeski would go off and drown out Martin and Wood. Then, however, I saw them live, and now I appriciate this album so much more. They truely are fantastic at what they do, but, know this, this album is very, for lack of a better term, crazy at times. It takes a while to really appriciate the majority of the songs on it, but it is well worth it in the end.

5-0 out of 5 stars Thick, thick, thick, thick really good stuff!
Imagine the strongest jazz rhythm section you can (bass, drums, keys), get rid of all the superfluous stuff that usually hides them (vocals, guitars, and light shows), and then let 'em get nice and funky. MMW are only about advancing their groove, with an egoless melding that baffles the mind. Each of the plays so loosely, yet together they offer something that's incredibly well structured.

This release is really good stuff - "Chubb Sub" especially - and is the release that got MMW's name out of NYC and into the many converstations nationwide. However, your interests might be inclined toward one of their other realeases. For example, _It's a Jungle in Here_ is a bit funkier, _Tonic_ is quite a bit more mellow, and _Friday Afternoon in the Universe_ is a bit more convenitonal.

5-0 out of 5 stars careful.
Stone cold groove. Be careful. May damage groin area. These cats are some mad magicians.

5-0 out of 5 stars wow.
im speechless. this is music at it's finest right here. i have never listened to anything better than this. so jazzy, so smooth, so funky, so groovadistic. buy this cd. NOW. ... Read more


7. Soul Serenade
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Asin: B0000A4GAK
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 7485
Average Customer Review: 4.37 out of 5 stars
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It would be wrong to pigeonhole Derek Trucks as a southern rocker despite his ongoing day gig as the Allman Brothers Band's second guitarist. On his fourth solo album (actually recorded before his third, 2002's Joyful Noise) the young slinger shows what he's made of, and it's not barbeque and bourbon. Instead Trucks caters more to the martini crowd, giving a sophisticated cast to his slide guitar, snaking it into elegant musical conversations with a rather frivolous flute, and some off time drumming that are reminiscent of the clean jazz fusion that Traffic used to conjure up. On the opening track, "SoulSerenade"/"Rasta Man Chant," Trucks inserts some of the languid licks and flirts with Miles Davis before devolving into Bob Marley. "Bock to Bock" is a more structured affair that recalls Henry Mancini. Gregg Allman sits in on "Drown in My Own Tears" and spits out the bitter words in his grizzled voice while Truck follows along in aperfect slow dance, punctuating each of the singer's phrases with his own mournful slide. Trucks ventures south of the border in "Afro Romp" and the band evokes the great jazz drummer Elvin Jones on "Elvin." --Jaan Uhelszki ... Read more

Reviews (19)

5-0 out of 5 stars Pop music fans need not apply...
The fourth installment from The Derek Trucks Band, Soul Serenade, which was apparently recorded before 2002's Joyful Noise, works as fine a follow-up as I can imagine. While Soul may rock less than Noise, its eclectic fusing of jazz, rock, Indian, blues, and even folk amalgamate to beautiful results.

These recordings-all-instrumental, save for Track 3, sung by Gregg Allman who's in fine form-are sophisticated compositions that have a discernible melodic structure-sometimes lacking from "jam bands." But to merely call TDTB a jam band would be doing them a disservice. The jams are never self-indulgent; they have direction and balance. The musicians have such a tight synergy between them that it appears they've been playing together for a decade or two. The tunes are at times jazzy: ("Bock To Bock"), funky: ("Soul Serenade/Rasta Man Chant"), bluesy: ("Drown In My Own Tears"), and ethereal: ("Oriental Folk Song" & "Sierra Leone"). Despite sounding like a mere rambling of music styles, the songs on the disc actually coalesce into a natural togetherness-creating a unified vibe.

The key word for this band is taste. They tastefully employ the use of flute (a rather audacious choice that works so well), played by the widely talented Kofi Burbridge. They tastefully keep their tunes to a reasonable length, never overplaying as far as I'm concerned. Even the packaging and liner notes (though a bit laconic) show good taste.

Like all great art, and I do believe this album exemplifies great art, Soul Serenade is truly original. But if I had to liken it to something, I'd compare them to Traffic (at their zenith), of course The Allman Brother's Band, and Wes Montgomery (the late jazz guitarist). And because it's great art, it's absolutely NOT for everyone. There are no "pop hooks" (I loathe that phrase) or riff based songs. There's no maudlin display of musicianship or image. There are simply forty or so minutes (I wish there was more) of great music.

The last thing I'll say is about Trucks himself. The CD includes a bonus interview where D.T. offers up his own take on his music. After watching this, I felt a tremendous respect for him; he is articulate, humble, and wise beyond his years. It's nice to know there are some artists who know not only what they're doing, but also why they're doing it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Pop fans need not apply...
The fourth installment from The Derek Trucks Band, Soul Serenade, which was apparently recorded before 2002's Joyful Noise, works as fine a follow-up as I can imagine. While Soul may rock less than Noise, its eclectic fusing of jazz, rock, Indian, blues, and even folk amalgamate to beautiful results.

These recordings-all-instrumental, save for Track 3, sung by Gregg Allman who's in fine form-are sophisticated compositions that have a discernible melodic structure-sometimes lacking from "jam bands." But to merely call TDTB a jam band would be doing them a disservice. The jams are never self-indulgent; they have direction and balance. The musicians have such a tight synergy between them that it appears they've been playing together for a decade or two. The tunes are at times jazzy: ("Bock To Bock"), funky: ("Soul Serenade/Rasta Man Chant"), bluesy: ("Drown In My Own Tears"), and ethereal: ("Oriental Folk Song" & "Sierra Leone"). Despite sounding like a mere rambling of music styles, the songs on the disc actually coalesce into a natural togetherness-creating a unified vibe.

The key word for this band is taste. They tastefully employ the use of flute (a rather audacious choice that works so well), played by the widely talented Kofi Burbridge. They tastefully keep their tunes to a reasonable length, never overplaying as far as I'm concerned. Even the packaging and liner notes (though a bit laconic) show good taste.

Like all great art, and I do believe this album exemplifies great art, Soul Serenade is truly original. But if I had to liken it to something, I'd compare them to Traffic (at their zenith), of course The Allman Brother's Band, and perhaps Wes Montgomery (the late jazz guitarist). And because it's great art, it's absolutely NOT for everyone. There are no "pop hooks" (I loathe that phrase) or riff based songs. There's no maudlin display of musicianship or image. There are simply forty or so minutes (I wish there was more) of great music.

The last thing I'll say is about Trucks himself. The CD includes a bonus interview where D.T. offers up his own take on his music. After watching this, I felt a tremendous respect for him; he is articulate, humble, and wise beyond his years. It's nice to know there are some artists who know not only what they're doing, but also why they're doing it.

4-0 out of 5 stars Very Good
There are some very mixed reviews of this disc, and I'm surprised. Of the seven tracks, the lone vocal is "Drown In My Own Tears," and Gregg Allman sounds great juxtaposed against the classic Trucks slide guitar sound--this slow blues indeed would have sounded right at home on the Allman Brothers LP "Hittin' The Note."

The opening track, "Soul Serenade/Rasta Man Chant" is arguably the longest, with Trucks contributing the familiar licks of the former before a long, slow reggae-influenced slide guitar piece featuring Kofi Bainbridge on flute. Other reviewers have stated that there's too much flute on this recording, and still others have said that there's a drop in quality after the first three tracks. I disagree--every track here is strong, with mostly slow blues numbers featuring tasteful flute charts echoing that beautiful guitar. Although the comparison is apples and oranges, the brief closer, "Sierra Leone," is more acoustic than the rest and reminds me of the way the ABB ended "Eat A Peach" with "Little Martha." All of these tracks are good, though. "Elvin," "Afro Blue," "Bock to Bock" and especially "Oriental Folk Song" more than hold the standard. This is my first introduction to solo Derek Trucks, so I can't speak to his other efforts, but I really like this one.

3-0 out of 5 stars Not Bad, But Hold The Flute.
This material was actually recorded in 2000 (I believe) and left on the shelf for a while. The first two cuts (there are only 7) are the best on the CD. They also illustrate the style of the music quite well; which is mellow jazzy blues folk/rock with hints of world music mixed in. This is by far the most layed back album Derek Trucks has ever released, but it is still good stuff (mostly). Though, after the third track things really get fluty (as in the flute) and the direction of the music becomes monotonous and pointless. I would recommend this album only to Derek Trucks fans and to people who find The Allman Brothers too heavy-sounding.

4-0 out of 5 stars Are two great songs enough for an album?
Derek Trucks is an incredible musician. He brings virtuosity, taste, variety, and great musicians with him every time he releases an album. And I have all of them.

Derek Trucks comes in many flavors. Some of these flavors are nice, interesting, educational, etc. The blues flavor is my favorite. So, each album has only a few songs that I really like. Yet, I like those songs so much that I listen to them over and over. And, those songs provide all the value I need to buy the album.

In the "Soul Serenade" album, there are two songs that provide that value: Drown In My Own Tears (which has enough value for the whole album) and Soul Serenade.

I played this album for some good friends who love the jazz flavor. They loved it so much that I gave it to them. I had to buy myself another copy to replace it. ... Read more


8. Friends Seen & Unseen
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Asin: B0002ABT4Y
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 2865
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Hunter has scaled down from the 2003 quintet of Right Now Move, returning to the guitar-drums-saxophone format that he launched in 1993. Retaining Derrek Phillips on drums and John Ellis on tenor, flute, and bass clarinet, Hunter continues to find fresh approaches to the groove, using his 8-string guitar to create bass lines and organ-style riffs in support of his minimalist leads. He's a master of musical inference: witness "Soweto's Where It's At," a serene invocation of the South African township, drenched in American gospel and roots blues. "Shuffle" builds its electric intensity from Hunter's wah-wah pedal, while "Bonus Round" is a kind of high-speed bop with subtle harmonic dimension. It's often the slow tunes here that show Hunter's finest qualities. "Slow Blues" is just that, testimony to how much the guitarist has grown. It's perfect, soulful playing, anchored by Phillips's time-keeping and amplified by Ellis's tenor. --Stuart Broomer ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars There was a time . . .
. . . when Charlie Hunter could get by with this kind of thing sheerly on its novelty value.

That time is past.

Thank goodness.

Since he first began plying his trade as one of the very few practitioners of eight-string, bass 'n' rhythm/comping/lead guitar playing in the history of jazz, he has staked out territory almost exclusively his own. Everyone from casual listeners to professional guitarists scratches his head in amazement at both the brain ordering and manual dexterity necessary to play both bass and guitar lines simultaneously.

But the time eventually comes when the novelty wears off. What then? Unless an iconoclastic artist like Hunter can develop an authentic voice worth hearing, there's not a whole lot left.

With his last two discs, Right Now Move and esp. this one, Friends Seen and Unseen, Hunter has honed his approach to a point where he transcends the limitations of his instrument.

A question regarding Hunter has always either been directly in play or at least hanging on the fringes of any encounter with the man or his music, namely, Why don't you just hire a bass player and concentrate on developing your guitar technique? Friends Seen and Unseen, I believe, definitely answers that question.

Stripped down to a trio format, with longtime mates John Ellis (tenor sax, bass clarinet, and flute) and Derrek Phillips (drums) on board, this group on Friends . . . stakes out and defines a kind of bloozy/funky territory all its own. Hunter has been slowly working his way up to producing a disc of this magnitude, and, after nearly a decade, has finally nailed it. All the effort honing his approach, integrating his brain and fingers, has finally delivered the kind or relaxed, entirely pleasurable, impossible-to-gainsay disc that fans of his have, lo these many years, yearned for.

What vaults this disc ahead of Right Now Move is the results he achieves with the minimal sound palette. In a way, it's a lot easier to make a memorable statement with a larger ensemble of players, e.g., recent efforts by Mike Brecker, Wayne Shorter, Josh Roseman, and others. That I believe he did with his last disc. Having the confidence gained from its nearly universal success both commercially and popularly, Hunter took a chance and returned to the paired-down format of bass/guitar, sax, and drums. Perhaps it's just that after doing this kind of thing for the last decade has finally enabled him to reach critical mass; perhaps the stars were somehow serendipitously aligned; perhaps these players have achieve a kind of group simpatico that only occasionally visits those who've been faithful to their muse. I don't know. What I do know is that this is one smokin' disc.

I confess that I prefer Hunter in a more adventurous setting, as with, e.g., Garage a Trois, but this disc, if carefully attended to, graces the thoughtful listener with its own unique pleasures. Not to be missed. ... Read more


9. Steady Groovin'
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Asin: B0007TKH8O
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 17287
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Although not clearly stated in the title, this is a compilation of the soul-jazz-funk-jam band's songs aimed primarily at those new their sound. The album highlights Soulive’s more upbeat improv tendencies and their genre-stretching abilities. Comprised only of drums, guitar and keyboards (bass is handled by pedals from Hammond B-3 man Neil Evans), the threesome gets a lot of sound out of it’s relatively stripped down format. Crisp and tight, the approach finds common ground between Booker T. & the MGs' crackling R&B instrumentals, Medeski, Martin and Wood’s more experimental acid jazz and even Brian Auger’sJimmy Smith based vibe. The programming features the band’s buoyant nature, especially on the Fred Wesley dominated "Doin’ Something," and the live tracks. Expanding into hip-hop with The Roots' (Black Thought rapping on "Clap"), the group stumbles slightly from an all-instrumental M.O. but shows an impressive willingness to broaden their horizons. A cover of Stevie Wonder’s "Golden Lady" from a Japanese release is the disc’s one rarity and probably isn’t enough to entice established fans. As Soulive’s final release on Blue Note, Steady Groovin’ works best as an overview as opposed to a straight hits collection/contract fulfiller, and is an excellent place for those unfamiliar with the group to hop on board. --Hal Horowitz ... Read more


10. All Kooked Out!
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Asin: B000006O4H
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 8129
Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars
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New Orleans drummer Stanton Moore can be found providing the backbeat for the groovy Galactic or the New Orleans Klezmer Allstars. While much has been made of Moore's ability to lay down the funk, All Kooked Out! also touches New Orleans second-line marches and a bit of postbop. Moore is mostly joined by guitarist Charlie Hunter and saxophonist Skerik (Tuatara, Critters Buggin') for a groovy studio session that leaves plenty of room for each to shine. Hunter and his eight-string guitar in particular step to the forefront--playing heads and laying a nice melodic veneer over the syncopated rhythms. When it's time to tear the roof off, Moore brings in extra New Orleans-style horns, giving some songs a good-time Dirty Dozen Brass Band feel. Nicely paced, varied, and played, All Kooked Out! is a fine debut by Moore, a gifted musician with a flair for strong, syncopated beats. --Tad Hendrickson ... Read more

Reviews (20)

5-0 out of 5 stars Incredibly Good
I love Galactic and the jazz/funk revival that they've led along with the Greyboy Allstars and Medeski Martin & Wood. This is without a doubt the best album to come out of that genre that I have ever heard. Stanton Moore, Charlie Hunter and Skerik have composed one of the most dynamic and fun jazz albums in recent memory. This is not the sound of a stuffy jazz club; this is the sound of a sweaty dance floor where the audience is cheering wildly and the alcohol is flowing freely. Simply put, the album's amazing. If you like any of the above bands or older Headhunters-type jazz fusion, buy this right now. You will not take it out of your cd player for months.

5-0 out of 5 stars Stanton Moore and his mates sure know how to groove
I endorse the comments from mlaurence of Gloucester and also add that if you enjoy the music of Charlie Hunter, especially his album Ready Set Shango, then go for this set from Stanton Moore which includes Hunter on 8 string guitar. You can just feel the live energy in this music and the musicianship from all the guys is just supreme. The video clip and extra information on this enhanced CD are an added bonus.

5-0 out of 5 stars The funky drummer........THE FUNKY DRUMMER!!..........
.....as Mr. James Brown once declared. Stanton Moore is definately carrying that torch high from cats like: Clyde Stubblefield, Jabo Starks, Ziggy Modeliste, Idris Muhammad, Bernard Purdie, Billy Cobham, Harvey Mason, Lenny White, Mike Clark & Alphonse Mouzon (just a few of my favorites). This album is alot funkier than his follow up "Flyin' the Koop", which has more experimental tunes and straight ahead jazz (a good album also). Needless to say, I love classic funky soul jazz and this album falls right in line and get's many listens in my pad. Get it!

4-0 out of 5 stars These "Kooks" Are Crazy in a Good Way
The New Orleans drummer from Galactic gets all funked out on jazz. Joined on a few tracks by Charlie Hunter, the record is one heady twist after another and registers a 10 on the pure fun scale. Moore demonstrates his easy intuition with rhythm, and the rest of the players on this session follow his lead to let it all hang out and have a blast.

5-0 out of 5 stars Awesome
If you like funk you will enjoy this album. I think it is similar to John Scofield's Bump album. Moore's drum work is pretty amazing. ... Read more


11. Combustication
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Asin: B00000AFSZ
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 8235
Average Customer Review: 4.33 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com's Best of 1998

The rather plainly named Medeski Martin & Wood have almost single-handedly returned the spotlight to the more out-there fusion between bop jazz and on-the-one funky rock music. Wheezing and huffing behind a bank of old-school keyboards, Medeski Martin & Wood plow into their songs with abandon. The drums of Billy Martin push the band out and away rather than gathering them neat and tidy, while bassist Chris Wood delivers the rhythms that somehow manage to keep every musical tidbit strapped to the deck. For his part, keyboardist John Medeski slaps and whacks his keys with inspired malice, all the while leaning heavy on the volume pedal. With the addition of DJ Logic further warping this band's sound, Medeski Martin & Wood have reached escape velocity and are now orbiting the planet. They may never come back. --S. Duda ... Read more

Reviews (51)

5-0 out of 5 stars Medeski, Martin, & Wood always Experimenting
The new release "Combustication" by New York jazz trio Medeski, Martin, and Wood is a delicious treat. The album shows off the musical tastes each member has been dabbling with since their 1996 release, "Shack Man." From funk grooves, to ethereal trance, to spaced-out jam music, MMW is again experimenting, and if anything; they prove that jazz can be creative as well as popular. One of the best aspects of "Combustication" is the addition of DJ Logic on some of the 12 tracks. Logic fills the tiny space left in the songs with wierd scratches, and those neat video game sounds. MMW purists will dig "Sugarcraft" and "Start-Stop," while those interested in the group's newer sound will love "Church of Logic," and "Hypnotized." "Whatever happened to Gus" has an avante-garde feel, with spoken word by NY artist Steve Cannon. MMW is a contemporary group that is always experimenting, and always improvising. If you see them play live, you'll understand. "Combustication" deserves five stars.

4-0 out of 5 stars "Bent me all outta shape"
For a decade the Brooklyn trio of pianist John Medeski, drummer Billy "Illy B" Martin, and bassist Chris Wood has been honing and refining one of the most unique sounds in the music world. MMW's 1998 effort "Combustication" thrust them into the spotlight and signifies a turning point for the band not only in terms of success but also style. This album is more complex than previous splendid efforts like "It's a Jungle in Here" and "Friday Afternoon in the Universe." It breaks new ground with cuica and organ fueled madness, but it does not abandon the bands' influences which range from Charles Mingus and Sun Ra to Jimi Hendrix and Bob Marley. Tracks like "Just How I Pictured It," "Everyday People," and "Nocturne" are all both auditorially pleasant and musically extravagant, inducing a true "trance" that so many electronic artists seek to create. MMW is a standing testament to the power of the organic trio, although they do bring in the talented DJ Logic to augment tracks on this record. This record is a must have, along with their most recent effort "The Dropper." Listeners who enjoy these two releases will not be disappointed with the earlier work should they opt to pick up the full MMW catalog. Fans of Jazz, Rock, Acid, True Hip Hop and virtually any other real music lover will thoroughly enjoy this record.

5-0 out of 5 stars Somewhere in the middle...
MMW has changed over the years, from a more straight-up funky avant-garde jazz band to a group of studio experimentalists exploring sonic textures as much as the intricacies of the groove. DJ Logic, who appears here, may have been an impetus for this shift, and the two studio albums since this release show this heightened sense of experimentalism even though Logic doesn't appear on them. Here, the band is beginning to launch off in these new directions but still stays very grounded in what worked for them in the past. My favorite here has to be the B-3 soul version of "Everyday People," which brings out a gospel feel I never noticed in the original. The fact that MMW can interpret a pop standard in an enlightening new way displays their depth of understanding of music as a whole. These guys are bringing jazz back to its edgy roots by pushing it forward. This is a flawless disc and an easy way to discover them and become a convert to the growing MMW fanbase. Still waiting on a new release, guys, it's been awhile!

5-0 out of 5 stars If You Like This..
This album is great and if you like it it there is a remix album that adds a little more hip hop flavor.

4-0 out of 5 stars Cosmic, funky, acoustic, hawaiian, : defies categorization
This CD stays in the player for days at a time. It's filed under jazz just because it doesn't fit anywhere else. I'm not sure about these guys genesis; there's always a hint of big island primitive in every CD. This one specially has the extra groove of those wild space sounds, man. I'm gonna go buy another of their CD's now. laterzzzzz... ... Read more


12. A Go Go
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Asin: B0000069NM
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 8175
Average Customer Review: 4.39 out of 5 stars
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John Scofield's stature as a modern jazz master on electric guitar puts him in a sweet spot for this simmering, sexy collaboration with acid jazz pathfinders Medeski, Martin and Wood, Scofield's taut and spicy lines striking sparks against the soulful grooves pitched by drummer Billy Martin, keyboard colorist John Medeski, and bassist Chris Wood. Far from a cheap commercial shot, the leader's plunge into this reheated '60s style is appropriately redolent of its funk heritage and his own astringent command of sharp lyrical and smart harmonic asides. --Sam Sutherland ... Read more

Reviews (67)

5-0 out of 5 stars Has A Good Beat...Easy To Dance To...5 Stars
This recording is a phenomenon. I went to a MMW concert recently and there were a lot of young folks there. One fellow struck up a conversation saying he had come down from Seattle for this. He wondered how I knew of MMW and I told him that I'm an old Scofield fan. He told me about how he was just discovering Scof etc.

This album is shaking up some worlds. Last night I went to a Scofield concert and was delighted to find that the attendees were generally younger than I. Most jazz shows in this town are attended by your nose-in-the-air, dried up, dusty, BORING jazz "enthusiasts". Jazz is something else to me than soft and easy listening milk-toast.

Now John Scofield, there's some jazz. I have never heard an album from him I didn't like and this is no exception. "Scof" means something's gonna touch you and make you feel it.

This recording has a lot of variety due to the eclectic nature of MMW. They are so much fun, and so is John, that ! this music is just plain enjoyable. It lifts my spirits to listen to it. It's actually quite comedic in places.

I hope these guys get together for another one some time as this is an excellant combination.

5-0 out of 5 stars Scofield and MMW!!! What More Could You Ask For?
I discovered this album only recently and have never looked back. John Scofield has a distinct sound and feeling that is refreshing to say the least. Some may best describe it as "rough" or "edgy", however I find it to be unique and intriguing.

On this particular studio date, Scofield is joined by Medeski, Martin and Wood, who provide the perfect setting for Scofields guitar work. The result is a funky jazz album of high calibre, which never loses the listeners interest. Tracks including Boozer, Jeep On 35 and Chank are amazingly funky thanks to the superior drumming of Billy Martin, whilst Southern Pacific has a more percussive feeling. There is not a single track on this disc that can be considered to be of a lesser standard. This high quality consistancy is welcome, as often MMW tend to adventure into realms that move beyond the groove and into the obscure.

If your after funky jazz in a small group environment, then you will be hard pushed to find any better an example than "A Go Go". This CD is thoroughly enjoyable from start to finish, remaining deceptively simple in its musical complexity, whilst delivering some truly first class contemporary jazz.

5-0 out of 5 stars Funky As S**t
Almost every track on this album makes me want to get up and dance... and I don't usually do that sort of thing. This is modern funk at its best. The improv by everybody is as good as is the groove. If your looking for complicated lines and advanced harmonic ideas, this probably isn't your album, but with a few nicely placed harmonic, and rhythmic suprises this album reigns as one of my All Time Favs.

5-0 out of 5 stars Groove from Start to Finish
This disc is unbelievable. Although Scofield wrotes the tunes, just as much credit has to be given to MMW on this disc. Martin and Wood hold down the tightest groove throughout the disc and Medeski is the perfect counterpart to Sco's solos and melodies. This disc really hints at what Sco would be up to a few years later with "Uberjam" and the current John Scofield Band. These guys know how to play together and it really shows on this disc.

5-0 out of 5 stars Sco's best...
An easy listen all the way through- a friend once described it as something like sophisticated funky bachelor-pad music and that's not so wrong. There's a lot of subtlety that will grow on you, trust me, it's addictive and fun. Great for driving, chillin at home, sitting and thinking. It's feels less forced than some of Sco's later "Jam" efforts and MMW doesn't head for outer space here so it's a decent intro to their sound for the uninitiated. Flawless. ... Read more


13. Uninvisible
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Asin: B000063DSJ
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 11277
Average Customer Review: 4.26 out of 5 stars
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It's possible to admire Medeski Martin and Wood's craft and guile in pushing against stylistic restraints while recognizing that their music isn't quite as much fun as it once was--or that this hugely popular trio may think it is. Full of shaggy cross-textures, plummy grooves, and spooky electronic underpinnings, Uninvisible is a lively sonic stew. Once a universe unto themselves, keyboardist John Medeski, drummer Billy Martin, and bassist Chris Wood continue to smartly expand their jam-band base, here featuring a brash five-piece horn section from the Brooklyn-based Antibalas Afrobeat Orchestra, turntablists DJ Olive and DJ P Love, and, for a spoken-word number, craggy-voiced Southern rock eccentric Col. Bruce Hampton. When Medeski is riding that Hammond organ and the group is taking its patented soulful detours, as on "Pappy Check" and the Booker T-ish "Smoke," all is right with the world. But even with Medeski dabbling on a roomful of other instruments, including the Mellotron, mini-Moog, and Arp, the songs don't have a lot of variety. And crowded with effects, the music can bog down in its own abstract logic--though there's no resisting the ping-pong game being played on "Off the Table." The chief rewards of Uninvisible are in the details. Until further notice, a headphone advisory is in effect. --Lloyd Sachs ... Read more

Reviews (27)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Art
Uninvisible continues where The Dropper (MMW's last release) left off. Building sonic artwork with layers upon layers of instruments and sounds MMW (with help from a few guests) have reached a new point in their career. They no longer have the sound of a mere funky organ trio (though that alone would have given them a place in the history books). They take it to a new level with the use of everything from a horn section to electronics to various "exotic" percussion instruments. Like any great artist,MMW is constantly moving forward with their artwork. They're far from the place they were 5 years ago and will probably have a radically different sound in 5 years from now. MMW create something new,fresh,and beautiful with every new album they release. Uninvisible may be very different from the albums I was first introduced to MMW on (Friday Afternoon In The Universe,Shack Man etc.), but that driving groove and interstellar connection that Chris Wood,Billy Martin,and John Medeski share is still and will always be the base of their music. The fact is that Uninvisible is great and should be checked out by anyone who truly enjoys music.

By the way, if you haven't yet witnessed MMW live do yourself a favor and catch a show. It'll blow your mind.

5-0 out of 5 stars Always fresh, always progressive, always pure
Ive been following MMW since their release of Friday Afternoon in the Universe. I was mezmorized by their deep grooves, funky, spacey at times, that real hip beat the chris wood always fits in behind it all. When i first heard that they were still playin the the DJ stuff, I was glad, and almost worried. I love hear them push music, but i cant get enough of their real hip groove sound and style. After The Dropper, which was pretty out there at times... i was wondering if this one would go even farther out. This album, they took it out there, and retained all of their origional groove and funk.
This album caught my ears almost instantly.
Oh, and i was also really glad to hear the horn players on the album. It almost gets back to that feel of 'Its a Jungle in Here', which if you havent heard it, you must pick up.

MMW is ontop of their music, and will probably be there for a very long time...

4-0 out of 5 stars Handy
This is my 4th MMW album. I discovered in this order: John scofield - a go go, Combustication, Shackman, and this. I'm happy to say that this is one hell of an album. Worth the cash. I havn't seen much mention of track 8 - to me one of the best on the album. Won't be dissapointed. Make your own opinion.

5-0 out of 5 stars Don't listen to Lloyd from Amazon, he's an IDIOT
This album (which I own on the DVD-Audio release) is one of the best things I've heard in a long time. They explore new depths of the word "groove" with his album. It is, without a doubt, pure genious, and only an idiot would think otherwise. John Medeski's keyboard work is, as always phenominal, and blends so well with Billy Martin's drumming, and Chris Wood's bass work. Together, on this album, the three of them lay it down with wicked bass groves, and amazing percussion (featuring a kit drum, congas, motion drum, and I think I hear a djembe on the track "Retirement Song"). Antibalas' horns are, like all of Antibalas' work, awesome. DJ Olive lays it down quite nicely as well.

This album is a must have for anyone who is into jazz, jam, funk, or anything with a good groove to it. Pure genius!

4-0 out of 5 stars Funky, better variety
MM&W adds some instruments and sounds to the mix in "Uninvisible", and the result is a sound that is more listenable over the length of the album. A little spice of variety is all they needed to improve. The songs are mostly funky, and the spacier stuff is very good as well. ... Read more


14. Crazyhorse Mongoose
list price: $17.98
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Asin: B00005ABIZ
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 24703
Average Customer Review: 4.56 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (18)

5-0 out of 5 stars Groovy, baby!
Don't you love it when you take a chance, buy a CD and it turns out to be exactly the kind of music you were hoping for? I had heard of Galactic because Warren Miller uses their funky/jazzy tunes in a bunch of his skiing movies. After hearing "Hamp's Hump" and the title track, I figured if half the songs were this good then the album was worth it. Well, ALL the songs are that good! I also love the funky tunes used in the movies "Get Shorty" and "Out of Sight", but had yet to find a good band or CD that sounded like that. The search is over, Galactic is it (a little less organ than those movies, however!). You'll groove to all of these songs, about half include a lead singer. Galactic has a jazz sound to them but they maintain a primary funk feel to their music. Some might compare them to Medeski, Martin & Wood but I say MMW is the other way around, more jazz than funk. Regardless, if you've heard at least one Galactic song before you're going to love the rest of this album. And if you have never heard Galactic but like any of the stuff I've mentioned, give these guys a try. You might have a new fav.

5-0 out of 5 stars I don't know what you want to call this music, but it's good
Is it funky jazz? Or jazzy funk? Whatever you want to call it, it is a somewhat unique blend of melodic jazz and funky rhythms. I'm not normally a jazz fan, but this album blew me away. The musicians are good, the periodic vocals are outstanding, and the songs are strong. It would have been fun being in the studio watching these guys put this CD together. A strong "buy" recommendation to whoever visits this site and reads this review.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!
I've only gotten into Galactic recently, but I have absolutely loved everything that I have heard. The deep sounds of the saxaphone, the groove of the music, and the occasional raspy vocals make this a very enjoyable listen. Very nice with some great chunky grooves. This is not "lite jazz" so if you are looking for that, you probably need to go somewhere else. The sound of Galactic embodies everything that is New Orleans. If you have every visited the city and loved it, do yourself a favor and pick up a Galactic cd. If you have ever heard the "Preservation Hall Band" or just enjoyed a sax player on the street corner, you will be immediately whisked back to the feel and sound of New Orleans. I absolutely cannot say enough good things about this group and especially this cd, "Crazyhorse Mongoose". From "Love on the Run" to "Quiet Please" this cd absolutely rocks, I hope one day I have the privledge of seeing this group live in concert!

5-0 out of 5 stars Funky niblets
This is a solid funk/jazz/blues album that will have you groovin' out to every single one of the songs. Throw this disc in during a party, barbeque, after you get out of the shower, while your doing homework, when your driving, when your chilling with your buddies; its all good. It always puts you in that groovin' mood, and will definitely put your body in motion. I dig the instrumental stuff, but the bluesy vocals add for a nice change of mood. This album is funky to the core!

3-0 out of 5 stars Why were they holding back?
After hearing the live versions of most of these songs before hearing this album I was thouroughly dissapointed with how the songs were performed on this CD. Go Go, Love on the Run, and Crazyhorse Mongoose are all intense when heard live. On this CD they are slower and much less fiery than I was used to hearing them. This album just does not represent who Galactic is. Their new CD Late for the Future does that, and actually adds more. Leave this one go, and grab some live tapes of their shows to hear these songs with all of the intensity that they have. I couldn't believe Galactic could release this album and actually be satisfied with the end product. It's like the Sunday Afternoon Galactic here. Why not just play these songs like they do live without the lengthy solos? ... Read more


15. Live
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Asin: B00000I9AQ
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 18479
Average Customer Review: 4.54 out of 5 stars
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In the 1990s the junction of jazz and funk has become quite a popular destination. Of course, soul-jazz was prominent among serious jazz cats throughout the 1960s and 1970s, but in the 1990s, the bug has spread to rock audiences who want extended jams and some space to dance. When it comes to blending danceable grooves with well-executed and thoughtful improvisation, San Diego's Greyboy Allstars are state-of-the-art, and as with most jam bands, the live stage is the true proving ground. Tenor sax player Karl Denson is the one with the serious "jazz cred" and he proves it here in abundance, but the remaining four are as tight as your old bar-mitzvah suit. As a whole, the quintet tends toward a smoother, more melodic brand of funk, one with dollops of real "soul music," making this live record a treat for both your brain and your behind. --Marc Greilsamer ... Read more

Reviews (13)

5-0 out of 5 stars I want more!
This is by far one of my all time favorite albums. I bought it several months ago and I enjoy it still more each time I listen to it. Certainly it grows on you. Every track on the cd is captivating. It's so funky you cannot keep still while the improvisational exhibition stimulates your mind.

Live was the first Greyboy Allstars album I bought. Their live performance captured here shines. I bought A Town Called Earth afterwards and was a tad disappointed to hear their studio makes of the outstanding "Happy Friends" and "Tenor Man". They pale in comparison to the live counterparts that boasts an enormous energy, especially the rich solos of Karl Denson. The Allstars is a talented bunch indeed.

Living in Denmark, I may sadly never experience Greyboy Allstars live. I guess this brilliant album somewhat makes up for that.

5-0 out of 5 stars Yesssss!
Ok, I've seen the Allstars live so many times I couldn't even begin to count them - from tiny little bars years ago to the larger clubs - The Fillmore, Maritime Hall, and GAMH more recently.

I've always felt their studio albums were great but didn't really capture what they were/are all about. This live album is clearly their best album as it does capture who they are and what there music is about - FUN!

One can argue about the particular songs that are on the disc (or aren't), but no matter what you will crank this disc up and dance the night away.

Oh yeah, be sure to check out Karl Denson's other band - Tiny Universe - they are awesome.

3-0 out of 5 stars Sometimes it gels, sometimes it doesn't
The Greyboy Allstars come out with a take no prisoners, old school slab of funked up jazz on Hot Dog, which allows everyone a chance to be front and center. This almost perfect opening sets a high mark, too high it turns out. Freshman 10 takes the quintet down a more soulful avenue, highlighted by sparkling keyboards.

The first signs of trouble crop up in Get a Job and daunt the overall recording in the excesses of Tenor Man and an awful adaptation of Check Out Your Mind (perhaps explaining the stunning remake of the Mayfield gem that Karl Denson throws down on "The Bridge").

Happy Friends goes on for too long without ever getting exactly where you want it to, but for the most part the rest of the tracks perk along nicely, punctuated by cool solos, classic riffs and snippets, and underpinned by a solid rhythm section.

There is plenty of energy and talent here, but sometimes the jamming and stretching get too thin for the material.

5-0 out of 5 stars A must for Karl Denson fans-
I recently went to a Karl Denson's Tiny Universe show at the Alabama Theatre, which in my opinion is one the most elegant venues in the South East. It was the best concert I have ever been to. Even if the Derek Trucks Band, one of my favorites, hadn't played at all, it still would have been at the top of my list. For those of you who do not know, Karl played the saxaphone and flute in Greyboy Allstars. I did not expect the concert to be half as good as it was, mostly because Karls Studio albums, which i have, aren't half as good as the show. Don't get me wrong, the studio albums are amazing, but seeing Karl Denson live is like having a religious experience. After the show I had a hard time listening to his studio work. Although his recent release The Bridge hints at what the show is like, it doesn't quite cut it. That's when my friend turned me on to the Greyboy Allstars. This is as close as it gets to a Karl Denson show (since he hasn't produced a live album). This CD is still a small step down from seeing them live, but it is as good as a CD could possibly get.

5-0 out of 5 stars Not a bad track to be found.
If you like the Allstars, you'll love em live. Less produced and more engergy. If you like Grant Green, Funk, Galactic, etc. you will love these guys. ... Read more


16. Doin' Something
list price: $16.98
our price: $14.99
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Asin: B000059QYA
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 27603
Average Customer Review: 4.38 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Doin' Something, Soulive's Blue Note debut and second album overall, sees the organ-based groove-jazz trio creatively stretching beyond their heralded debut, Turn It Out. Where that session was a lean, live cooker that cemented the trio's appeal to the acid-jazz and jam-band crowd, Doin' Something reaps the rewards of time spent in the studio--there are overdubs and, more importantly, an ambitious, varied overall vision. Rather than just rattling off a dozen jams based on a single line, the tunes here are actual songs with memorable melodies that draw upon hip-hop, soul, funk, and pop to go along with the rump-shaking jazz grooves. Furthering the funk foundation, the trio--guitarist Eric Krasno and brothers Neal and Alan Evans on organ and drums, respectively, also brought in James Brown-veteran trombonist Fred Wesley to lead a four-piece brass section (and contribute horn arrangements) on a few tracks. This is the sound of a hot young band putting its best foot forward, and the great thing is, you won't be able to keep your foot from bouncing along.--Tad Hendrickson ... Read more

Reviews (24)

5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing Soul-Funk-Jazz
Before I delve into my review, I must say that this will be rather biased, as I know the drummer somewhat well and have other connections to the band (namely, their manager, jeff Krasno, Eric's brother). But I digress. This was my first Soulive album I bought, after seeing them 3 times live. I wasn't sure if I'd like the studio efforts for I know that they work extremely well live. However, after the first listen though, I was hooked. Yes, it doesn't have that same raw energy that they posess live or on Turn It Out; yes the sonic qualities and mastering of the recording may not be top top notch; but it just gives it its own flavor, which I think should therefore be viewed in a slightly different light from how you'd view them live to truly appreciate the efforts on here, which are plentiful. Onto the music.
The album opens with one of their better known tunes, Hurry Up...And Wait. If this doesn't get your foot tapping, then I don't know what will. I do not tire of this song ever. Definitely an album highlight. These guys posess that organic funk groove that makes the Meters or James Brown so much funkier than all the newer stuff held down by click tracks or (ugh) drum machines. However, as another reviewer noted, it's not AS organic as MMW gets. Next is one of three tracks to have a 4 piece horn section. Now I share the same sentiments with most other reviewers on here that Soulive loses some of it's essence having these guys play along. The tracks (Doin' Something, Cannonball and Roll The Tape) just don't seem to be as spontaneous as the others as just a trio or plus one horn feel, which of course would make sense since it is trio plus horn arrangement. But still, I prefer it to be just as a trio or trio plus horn. Track 3 is Evidence, and this is the debut of Neal playing piano, which some may not like, but I absolutely love. This is another one of my favorite tracks off this album by far. Next is another well known tune, One in Seven, and is one of the more distinctive cuts. Bridge to 'Bama is next and is quite good. Check out how the tenor sax man (not detrimental to the song in any way) always comes back into the same melody during his solo, giving the song a strong sense of unity for which to expand off of. Cannonball is next, one of the horn section pieces, and is fine in its own right, but questionable as to it belonging on here.
Shaheed is track 7, possessing a rather memorable melody played down low on Neal's B3, and serves as a great transition from Cannonball into Romantic, the album's one vocal piece. Stephanie McKay provides those, and one can tell she has as much soul as the three backing her in easily the most emotionally moving piece on Doin' Something. Afterwards is another one of my favorite tracks, Solid. It just has that quirkiness to it which I've grown to love from these guys. Next is Roll The Tape, which I like best of the three horn section pieces. Some of the solos on here seem rather haunting for the key/mode they're chosing, very modern and cool. Last is another on of my favorite cuts, Joe Sample. Two simple melodies start it off and they end it all with one statement of the Steppin' riff off of Turn It Out. But wait! Probably the most surprising thing of this album exists after the song supposedly ends. It is Neal playing solo piano in more of a true jazz-classical style, and it is astounding; first because one most likely wouldn't expect it from him, and second, one wouldn't expect to hear it on a Soulive album! Assuming you can appreciate the piano greats like Bill Evans, McCoy, Chick and Herbie, you should love this. This album I hope I should not tire of for a long time to come.

5-0 out of 5 stars A New Feel for Soulive
Having listened to the first two CDs by Soulive extensively I can say that "doin' something" is a definite switch from the raw groove of the previous efforts. The band's new CD offers the slick production you might expect from a Blue Note release and gives fans of Soulive something new to digest in the way of new composition, different tempos, a decidedly different base influence (more pure jazz than funky groove) and a mix of musicians that compliment the new tunes rather well.

Being a Soulive convert due to their fan base in the hippie/jam band scene I was expecting more of the groovy funk feel but was pleasantly surprised that this was a strong studio compilation - the new tunes will most definitely play out for some incredible live renditions. A fan of Soulive or good music in general will most definitely be pleased with this CD.

4-0 out of 5 stars fresh sound
Great sound a -little smooth at times though. This is a great trio of young players but the guitarist's "hep-jazz-cat" look is pretty funny.

4-0 out of 5 stars Horn Controversy
As there seems to be a bit of controversy over the horn section I thought I'd break the tie. First of I play trumpet so there's nothing I like more than some fat brass licks and solos, however, most of the tracks with horn arangements seem a little out of place and choppy if you will. Also in comparison with their first album this one does have a smooth and slightly overproduced sound which seems to be taking them farther and father from their original vibe of "live preformance as the escence of music" (or somthin like that). Don't get me wrong, it's not a bad albumto put on and groove to, it just doesn't have that same raw, in-the-club, jam feel that turn it out did.

5-0 out of 5 stars Soulive is amazing
I love this CD, and would definately recommend it to anyone. ... Read more


17. Steady Groovin'
list price: $11.98
our price: $11.98
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Asin: B0007TKH84
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 42558
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18. Joyful Noise
list price: $12.98
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Asin: B00006IK03
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 7012
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

The third album from guitar phenom Derek Trucks resounds with joyful noise indeed, and amazingly, it seems as though Trucks and his band run through (at least) 10 distinct genres across these 10 songs. Trucks may venture all over the musical map--blues, soul, jazz, Eastern music, to name a few stops--but he does so with a confidence and assertiveness usually found in much older musicians. Then again, he is the nephew of Butch Trucks (a fellow member of the Allman Brothers Band, Trucks's moonlighting gig) and is married to fellow guitar wiz Susan Tedeschi (who guests on this album), so it's not surprising that he seems experienced beyond his years. Joyful Noise features a host of guest artists--including Qawwali singer Rahat Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and soul legend Solomon Burke--but despite the considerable variety here, the album maintains a unified, if high-flying and eclectic, vision. Even at such a young age, Trucks already plays with skill, invention, and heart.--Genevieve Williams ... Read more

Reviews (25)

2-0 out of 5 stars Not quite
Trucks is an amazing guitarist, that's a given. One only need listen to his work in the Frogwings era or his jam sessions with the Allmans to understand.

As of late, however, his music has declined. The band he's playing with on this album are beneath him and it shows. I had a chance to see Derek live in Boston and most of the music he played at the show was from this album. The only decent member of the band is the drummer. The horn player/keyboardist and bassist are terrible...they simply meander through the songs with uninspired laziness. In fact if it were simply laziness than I would understand...these guys plain stink.

Anyway, Derek needs to get back to his blues roots and stop pandering to the jam-band crowd. That's where he truly shined. But if he needs to sell albums and make money by simply tossing out a few "jazz" tunes to the jam-band crowd (who, to begin with, wouldn't know jazz if it landed on their noses and farted) than more power to him...I'll continue to listen to him play the blues from years back and long for his return.

5-0 out of 5 stars Diversified!
Trucks has a wonderful slide style. He's so smooth. This CD has a type of worldbeat quality to it. I love that stuff! The first track has such a great groove to it (you can hear that Allman Brothers influence) but then you hear Ruben Blades on Kam-mo-lay and there's a hint of Santana. However, Derek's own personal style is definitely not lost on any of the tracks. If you love slide guitar players and especially if you are a musician , you will definitely appreciate the "Joyful Noise" in The Derek Trucks Band!

4-0 out of 5 stars wise beyond his years
derek is an amazing gutarist. it's obvious that his primary influence is the mighty duane allman, although derek posses a much grander global view of music. when listening to this albulm one can hear metallic fusion, soul(ala solomon burke), funk, blues, indian and free-form jazz and the pumping opening track gospel. derek transcends the mediocre jam band music scene becuase he plays like a fifty year old black man on a soljurn to the great divide.

5-0 out of 5 stars Derek comes into his own....
Derek could stick within the frame of an Allman Brothers sound and he'd do just fine. But he takes a spirited romp through world music and comes up sounding just as comfortable exploring these different musical genres. His band is excellent ( definitely see them live at all costs) and the arrangements are fluid. He gets in enough of his tasty slide licks without overwhelming the rest of the band or the listener. A fine album from a young, talented,and humble musician whom we will undoubtedly derive a lot more enjoyment from.

5-0 out of 5 stars This "Red Sox" fan says different!
Last night, at the 9:30 club in beautiful cherry blossom town, we had Derek Trucks and his fantastic band opening for Ratdog. This reviewer is here to say something different about the band than the other Bostonian. Respectfully, I think the "brother" from Beantown ate too many beans and is really full of it.
Is the purpose of playing music to show how proficiently you play? I've seen many a virtuoso who was dry as cracker dust, 10 miles from water. Mr. Beaner, sir, do you play any instument? I do. Derek's band does just what a musician can do and should do, and that is to be a channel for something spiritual and inspiring. They are hot and very soulful. I've been thinking of writing this for a while, as I feel sorry for you, man. What a snotty, negative, sad attitude you display. With that kind of viewpoint, criticizing musicians who have a great groove, and are in no way the way you portray them, I wonder what you actually do like. You want to tell Derek your expert advice as to sticking to blues and not pandering to the Jam band crowd? You put yourself above the Jam band crowd and call them ignorant. Aren't we all ignorant of some thing or other? Do we know everything? Bet you're real fun to hang with.....not. Kofi, Todd and Mike deserve to be on the stage with Derek as well as Yonrico. They blend together to produce some mighty good Southern Rock/blues, jazz and ethnic. I didn't find them lacking at all. Todd is the smiliest bass player I have ever seen. Kofi's a "homey", from DC, Othiel's brother, and plays a mean flute. Mike, I think that's his name, the vocalist, really emotes. Man, there's nothing lacking. Derek is exceptionaly gifted, and the most exciting slide guitarist I have ever heard. He's 24 years old, for God's sake. Do you play anything? What do you sound like? Obviously, great music did come along, and "farted in your face" and you were either too drunk or too full of stupid pride to "get it". For those who read this, I have to tell you, he is NOT representative of us Bostonians. Listen to "Click and Clack" on "Car Talk", NPR radio, for a better representation. Sadly, alas, we aren't all as "illuminated" as our illustrious "Teen age dirty Sox" fan. Sometimes us "stupid people" have more fun, though. We can enjoy something really great for being what it is. Who knows, maybe he had a sad experience with a priest when he was young. Pray for him. He needs it. Todd, I told you I was going to say this, and I did. I ran into Todd before the show and told him I was thinking of writing this this very morning. Derek and the band are also part of the "Anti-snob movement". They meet their fans afterwards. They're really pretty friggin' nice folks. So many people who came to the show had not heard of you guys, and loved the show. They came for Ratdog, and got a real treat hearing you. If you're in DC, listen to 89.3 FM, by the way. Derek's slide playing is like an instumental version of the pure fire and joy of Aretha singing gospel. "Joyful Noise"? Damn straight!! I'm a musician, by the way, and meandering aimlessly is not what they do at all. You don't need to be Bela Fleck or Isaac Stern to be enjoyable. Let's not condemn people so visciously, just because they aren't "tops" in their field. Millions of musicians who are great would not rate in the "virtuosity hall of fame", but so what. Can you feel the music? I can and do everytime I see these guys. OK, ciao! ... Read more


19. Up All Night
list price: $18.98
our price: $14.99
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Asin: B000088SS3
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 15809
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Already a part of two great jazz records in 2003--by Roy Haynes and the group ScoLoHoFo--guitarist John Scofield is back to his genre-bending self with 11 tracks of adventurous grooves that should attract contemporary jazz fans as well as lovers of jam bands, instrumental hip-hop, and dance music. Although the quartet collaborated on nearly half the tunes, Up All Night is more structured than Uberjam, the Scofield band's 2002 effort. It's less a jam session, more a rhythmic showcase for the group and the special dirty effects, memorable riffs, and long darting lines of the leader. The head-bopping, finger-snapping quotient is high on many numbers, especially the first two tracks and "Four on the Floor." "Thikhahali," his tribute to Fela Kuti's Afrobeat style, is priceless. There are go-go riffs on "Philopiety," industrial beats on "Freakin' Disco" and "Every Night Is Ladies Night" and through it all a musician at the very top of his game. --Mark Ruffin ... Read more

Reviews (16)

4-0 out of 5 stars Another Fine Scofield Recording
"Up All Night" is a very fine recording. Since "Up All Night" and "Uberjam" are essentially the same line ups (John Scofield Band), it is natural to compare the two recordings. Admittedly, I think "Uberjam" is my favorite of the two recordings. When I first heard "Uberjam," it really caught my attention. As other reviewers have noted, "Uberjam" had some memorable melodies, cool musical twists, turns and textures, and tidbits of hidden treasures, such as in-and-out exchange of real drums and techno drums, interesting deep-sounding distorted bass lines and unique sound samplings. "Uberjam" was one of most exciting CD's I have purchased in recent years. When "Up All Night" was released, I was expecting something similar in energy and surprise to "Uberjam." "Up All Night" has its exciting and intense moments and is similar to "Uberjam" in its style, but as a whole it is more subdued, atmospheric and sets a certain mellow, dreamy mood. Also, some of the songs tend to meander a bit with drawn-out, repetitive rhythyms and groove beats. The songs reflect the concept of the title of the album--it is the kind of dreamy music a person would listen to if they were "Up All Night" in the wee hours of the morning.... Although not quite as eye-opening as "Uberjam," I still highly recommend "Up All Night" to any listener--it is another remarkable effort by John Scofield.

5-0 out of 5 stars Scofield shines again!
This is a wonderfully recorded album and the songs are "groovy" too. Scofield's playing in the past 4 years has never been better. The album he did recently with the ScoHoLoFo band is packed with killer guitar solos - just diggin' the fingers straight into the fret board. He has also played on Roy Haynes latest album w/ Joshua Redman and Dave Holland. That too is a treat - but ultimately I prefer Scofield in this environment. Here he can stretch out and just play effortlessly thru the funky themes.

This album has the same line up as Uberjam minus the guest appearances so if you like Uberjam - "Up All Night" comes highly recommended. John is cementing himself right up there with Metheny with some of the best guitar playing of his career - and some of the best guitar playing on the planet.

The rest of the band is good too, especially as John sprinkles short sound effects over the entire mix. Stuff like this is made for headphones. Gotta enjoy it. - and thank you for not creating just another Uberjam. The band has evolved in an intelligent direction - as all bands should strive to do.

5-0 out of 5 stars takes some time to get into
another dude already said it best, what seems to be "lacking" in terms of melody etc on this album is made up for with rhythm and texture.. i cant really compare to other scofield albums, ive heard tons of his stuff but this is the only album i own and am familiar with, and its certainly not what i expected when i happily grabbed up my first scofield band record. i was expecting the sort of music you sit down and listen to for the enjoyment of skilled musicians cutting loose in the context of romping funk, full of long extended solos and wierd chord changes and obscure rhythms etc. this album has all of that, but its sort of subdued in a wash of effects and abstraction. when scofield starts goin off, its not the sort of solo you can sit there and listen to in the usual sense of a guitar solo, its just another layer of sound over the whole rhythmic mess (so to speak). so really this album i would say is more geared towards a dance/hip hop/electronic mentality than jazz, since the melodies and harmonies that usually drive jazz are deeply overshadowed by all manner of dirty audio tweaks and thunderously locked in grooves banged out by the drums and bass. approaching this album from a more "traditional" viewpoint, it understandably is kind of hard to take. first listen i was highly unimpressed, the beats were great and all but it was just too wierd. once you stop worrying about the general melodic aspect and listen to it more in the context of drum and bass or trip hop, you realize just how trippy and awesome an album it is. even so i think it takes some time to sort of tune into the abstraction of it, the sharp grittiness of the bountiful effects processing and the sort of unpredictable abstraction that john often goes off into, dousing long, incomprehensible, dizzying guitar runs with auto-wah and filtering etc.. once you get a feel for just what the band is doing it becomes an extremely fun listen however, awesome for background music, chill rooms at parties, spacing out on headphones, bumping out of car systems, all that good stuff.... definitely reccomended to abstract/experimental fans as well as electronic music peeps, those into the wierder manifestations of dnb, trip hop and breaks

5-0 out of 5 stars Sublime!
I just love when I'm initially unsure about a record at first listen, but by the third it is simply so amazing I can't even tell you. I have been a "Scofan" for about 100 years and he never disappoints, this time he's just blown me away. Sco at his creative best.
John Scofield is to jazz what Thomas Keller is to cooking....
pjackso

5-0 out of 5 stars For an excellent guitarist
John Scofield was possibly the best guitarist that the great Miles Davis ever worked with, other than John Mclaughlin. I have to say, this new album helps show off Scofield's range of skills on the electric guitar. He kinda combines cool jazz with an upbeat almost shimmering quality that is his trademark. A must for any lover of good jazz-guitar-playing. Scofield also has some Afro-beat and Metropolitan-jive influences in his music that might be a little surprising to first time listeners. But, I must repeat that this is an excellent album and a good buy! ... Read more


20. Ruckus
list price: $18.98
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Asin: B0000CDL76
Catlog: Music
Average Customer Review: 4.46 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (35)

3-0 out of 5 stars Are you sure this is Galactic?
Let me start by saying I love Galactic. Their previous releases and live shows are stellar. This is still better than 90% of what passes for music anymore but compared with other Galactic CDs, it's a step backwards in my opinion. With all of their other CDs, I've loved 'em right from the get go. This one did not have that effect on me. It might grow on me but when I'm in the mood to hear some Galactic funk, this will not be the first album I reach for.

When I think of Galactic, I think of soaring and inspirational musicainship and sadly I find it lackling on this CD, at least in comparison to their others. I don't care much for the hip hop-y direction they are going here. That's not to say that I hate it but they are so much better than this. They sound bored. I agree with one of the other reviewers who called the sound repetitive. They set the bar so high musically that it would be nearly impossible to hit the same mark with every single release. It's definitely worth buying if you're a fan but I would strongly suggest any of their other CDs as a starting point if you're just discoving the band.

5-0 out of 5 stars Galactic's new album is amazing
One admirable quality that is rarely found among bands today is a willingness to take risks. On their recently released album "Ruckus," Galactic definitely took a risk- and it was worth it. While maintaining that unique funk that makes them Galactic, the band incorporated new ideas and styles that only enhance the sound we already love them for, and producer Dan the Automator blended these elements together for a harmonious feel. The musicianship of the instrumentalists is stirring, and what they are saying through the music is brilliantly articulated through Houseman's vocals on many of the tunes. "Bittersweet," "Tenderness," and "Never Called You Crazy," are my favorite tracks. If they are able to create this much magic on a studio effort, one can only imagine what they will conjure at their live shows. This album is a necessity for all Galactic fans, and a refreshing essential for those who are tired of hearing the same old thing.

3-0 out of 5 stars Very dissappointing
Galactic has been one of my favorite bands for several years. I ran out and bought this album the day it came out and I was extremely dissappointed. First let me say that I am all for bands changing their style and adding new elements to their music. After all, nobody wants to hear the same thing over and over again. However, this album does not even sound like the same band that I have loved for years. I think one of the other reviewers put it best, saying that they band members sound "bored" on this album. The songs have no direction whatsoever, and certainly don't demonstrate the talent and musicianship that the band members have. They have a complete lack of energy that I think is one of the fundamental aspects of Galactic's music. I thought that the album would grow on me but every time I throw it in the CD player it is just as painful to listen to as the last. Eventually, I even threw it in the box of "CD's to get rid of," along with Hootie and the Blowfish, Bush, and various other bad CD's that I've accumulated over the years.

While I love to see my favorite bands grow and change, this album doesn't sound natural to me. It sounds like they forced a lot of extra stuff into their music just to make it sound different. I gave it a 3 just because there is so much other bad music out there that still makes this album sound awesome.

4-0 out of 5 stars Something different...
for me. I'm not really familiar with 'funk' music since I mostly listen to metal and hardcore, but I discovered Galactic while looking through a different music site and decided to listen to the samples. I thought they sounded good enough so I bought the album and enjoyed it for the most part.

The faster songs are better, in my opinion, and I like how the bass sounds. I just wish there were more keyboards and saxophones, because those made the songs stand out more. The album was also a little repetitive at times, like when the drummer kept repeating himself, although he did excellent fills.

Pretty good and something different for me. I really like the songs Uptown Odyssey and Tenderness. Really good lyrics, too.

4-0 out of 5 stars Happy Surprise!
I was really afraid that Dan the Automater would suck the life out of Galactic. In my head, I heard a lifeless, electronic dance mix version of Stanton, Rich, Houseman and company. Happily, I was wrong. D the A accentuates rather than obliterates. The electronic flourishes are like a missing piece rather than the entire puzzle. Recommended cuts include "Bittersweet", "The Moil" and my personal favorite "Tenderness". If this doesn't get your south side shakin, nothing will. I guarantee it! ... Read more


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