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1. The Woods [Bonus DVD]
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2. Dig Me Out
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3. All Hands on the Bad One
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4. Bricks Are Heavy
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5. Call the Doctor
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6. One Beat
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7. The Woods
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8. The Hot Rock
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9. Sleater-Kinney
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10. The CD Version of the First Two
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11. Real Janelle
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12. My Body, the Hand Grenade
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13. L7
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14. To Mother
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15. Tiger Beat
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16. Inzombia
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17. That's Not What I Heard
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18. Saddle the Bridge
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19. Kaia
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20. Sweet Revenge

1. The Woods [Bonus DVD]
list price: $14.98
our price: $11.99
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Asin: B0008FPIO0
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 35
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

After its most prolonged absence from the recording studio, Sleater-Kinney has reloaded with a smoldering rock and roll record that rivals John Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band and Nirvana’s In Utero in terms of unexpectedness. It is a 180-degree proclamation to the album which came before it. Producer David Fridmann (Weezer, Flaming Lips) coaxed the Portland, OR trio to retool its approach to making music. The results are startling and far and away the most collaborative, experimental and risky in the band’s seven-record career. Corin Tucker’s supreme guttural form is on display from the lead-off track "The Fox"--a would-be children’s tale overridden by crunching power chords and drummer Janet Weiss’s battering percussion. The Woods tugs on your ear musically and stabs at your heart lyrically on riff-wielding jaunts "Wilderness," "Modern Girl" and "Rollercoaster." The live-in-one-take, 11-minute blockbuster "Let’s Call It Love" unleashes Carrie Brownstein’s foray into guitar-solo psychedelic. Haven’t heard Sleater-Kinney yet? Try Dig Me Out and work your way forward. Already on board? Find a steady chair, feel your ears bleed and watch your speakers disintegrate. --Scott Holter ... Read more

Reviews (22)

5-0 out of 5 stars THE WOODS?MORE LIKE ENTRACE TO THE WILDERNESS OF GREATNESS
HEAVIER, LOUDER, UNCUT.ACTUALLY ITS CUT BUT IT IS HEAVIER.I MEAN THE ACTUAL ALBUM ART ITSELF WEIGHS IT DOWN BY A GOOD 6-7 GRAMS, NO JOKE.

FIVE STARS.

5-0 out of 5 stars A new and improved (in ways!) Sleater-Kinney
My initial reaction to the first few seconds of the album was, "How can this fit in Sleater-Kinney's arsenal?" These seconds are filled with raw, grungy, distorted guitars and pounding, bass-heavy drums. This helps me, a devoted fan even in self-titled days, understand why after four relatively successful albums on Kill Rock Stars they would switch to Sub Pop, the label that put out some of the early Soundgarden and Nirvana albums.

When the vocals entered in the first track, "Fox," I was taken back to Sleater-Kinney's world. Corin's vocals are just as simultaneously wild and controlled as ever. As she sang the words, "land-ho!" I imagined she must have been sitting on a vibrating chair in the recording studio.

The second track, "Wilderness," is typical Sleater-Kinney with Hot Rock guitars and Carrie and Corin doing what seems like vocal impressions of each other. "Jumpers" has the classic-to-Sleater-Kinney desperate feel. "Modern Girl" is cheesy at best. "Rollercoaster" has a fun, almost go-go feel to it. "Let's Call it Love," in its eleven minutes, reminds me of the type of humor in which the joke gets so monotonous and annoying that you hate it, and just then, it gets hilarious again. Track placement should have called for "Let's Call it Love" as an ender instead of "Everything," which would be a better song if they weren't putting the album-ender pressure on it.

4-0 out of 5 stars Very good. 4.5 stars
My impressions: Sleater Kinney listeners will be taken by the freshness of the sound, the different mix. I was wowed! It sounds like the songs were recorded on one track -- it's very organic, yet mature. Underneath all the excitement surrounding a new album though, I'd say this album's quality is about the same as One Beat. I LOVE One Beat; there's not really a weak song on it. The Woods has moments of sheer brilliance and Mrs. Carrie Brownstein's six string investigates new territory not explored by SK previously. The drums are savage and complex. And I got chills once or twice at Corin's wail (love that passionate voice). "Laaaand ho!" Overall, SK remain head and shoulders above most acts today. Definitely worth the money.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Woods
Mostly very good, though in many places the guitars are mixed way above the vocals, maybe too much. "Modern Girl" is a production disaster, though--a distorted harmonica track? Ugh. "Entertain" falls into that marching-band-drummer thing that Janet Weiss sometimes seems to get stuck in. The bonus DVD was rockin', though the last track could have been recorded better.

5-0 out of 5 stars Seven albums strong.....
This album is a must-have for any music lover who chooses to see past the blights of American Idol and Britney Spears. For new fans, the band often takes a couple listens but they are worth it. For old fans, get ready to rock with Carrie's stellar guitar and a Sonic Youth-esque jam on "Let's Call it Love".

I have been a fan for about 6 years now and I can honestly say "The Woods" blows everything else out of the water. The lyrics have changed drastically from "One Beat's" overt (though justified) finger-flipping towards Bush. Instead, they come back with nuanced poetry that is far more venomous and subtle.
"The Woods" proves that Sleater-Kinney has that rare ability (ala Sonic Youth and Beck) to always sound like themselves whilst releasing dynamic new albums. Definitely worthy of the title "Rock Album". ... Read more


2. Dig Me Out
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Asin: B000003740
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 25736
Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com essential recording

With their two-guitar interplay and scrappy rock-goddess assault, Olympia, Washington, gave us the highly touted Sleater-Kinney who created something nearly impossible in 1997: a truly dynamic and vital punk album. Moreover, they're one of the only bands going that can dip into completely non-ironic, celebratory rock convincingly. Dig Me Out marks the point where the trio graduates from being a riot grrl band to simply being among the best rock groups around. --Roni Sarig ... Read more

Reviews (64)

5-0 out of 5 stars Energetic, emotional, sexy...fantasmo!
Sleater-Kinney is a band that had enjoyed quite a bit of hype in the mainstream media as a result I was somewhat hesitant to give them a chance. I am a fan of bands associated with the sadly and inexplicably overexposed riot girl movement and since Le Tigre seemed to endorse them, against my own better judgment, I bought this album.

And boy, am I glad I did. Time Magazine actually got it right! These are intelligent, sexy, talented women who have put together an album that is not quite as overtly political as Le Tigre or Bikini Kill, but nevertheless, they make their general disposition quite clear. They manage to turn love songs into feminist manifestos that are quite a bit more poetic and musical than something you might expect from bands that more clearly advertise their feminism.

This album's best songs are the more personal, "One More Hour" is a good example, where Corin Tucker can truly show off her vocal range, a talent usually wasted on more diluted genres. "Turn It On" is probably the best song lyrically, almost indescribable in content; but the tone is clearly one of deep anger and resentment...at some person...or thing? I don't know, and it doesn't matter.

And that is truly the strength of this album...its emotion. I highly recommend it!

2-0 out of 5 stars A Good Band, A Lousy Album
As frustrating as it is to see people dismiss Sleater-Kinney based on this album, I at least understand why. First of all, it was hailed as one of the best albums of 1998, and SPIN even labeled it one of the best 'punk' records of all-time. Not even hardly...essentially, it's just straight-ahead, 3-chord, medium-paced rock'n'roll. Most of the songs sound alike and all but say 2 or 3 are really memorable at all. The only thing that made this worth mentioning was that it was a girl-band, and I don't blame anyone who was let-down when it was shoved down their throats as an indy-masterpiece and turned out to be barely tolerable. and I am a FAN of Sleater-Kinney, in fact they may be one of my favorite groups, but I have barely listened to this album since it came out. I spun it a lot back in '98, never really took to it, and occassionally give it second chances. I never come out enjoying it - but I love the album that came before it, 'Call The Doctor', and the two follow-ups, 'Hot Rock' and 'All Hands On The Bad One'. Those ARE some of the best albums to come out of the past decade, featuring rich dynamics and wonderful harmonizations, not to mention steller songwriting. But the songs on Dig Me Out lack any imagination, and the performances are relatively flat. Why on earth did the critics pick this one to praise? Mad because they missed the boat on 'Call The Doctor' so they just clung to the next thing labeled 'Sleater-Kinney'? It was certainly over-hyped and I hope people who dislike it realize that even good bands make weak records, and I feel this is such a case.

5-0 out of 5 stars all the drama that you crave
Sleater-Kinney's Dig Me Out is not only one of the finest records of the 1990's, it's a pivotal cross-section of 90's music - spitfire women striking independence on one end, vulnerable earthy types pow-wowing on the other. It may be a masterful sonic assault of punk fury, but it's punk fury mixed with intimacy and fragility. When Corin Tucker wails in the title track to dig her, "out of my body, out of my skin," you feel wounded alright, but it's in the humanity of such a line and the honesty of its production. The songs don't let down from there - the sad love-triangle crackdown of "One More Hour," the fury of "Words and Guitar," the sexiness of "Dance Song '97." This is the moment that a very good band became a great one with the capacity to topple over rock's foundation by aiming for its heart.

5-0 out of 5 stars just adding to what's already said
A fantastic album from Sleater-Kinney, there's really nothing I can say that hasn't already been covered in the 60 some reviews of this album. I really wanted to share some trivia... the cover to this album is an homage to the Kinks, whose album The Kink Kontroversy the album design copies.

5-0 out of 5 stars Riot Grrrl
every song on this album puts a feeling in my stomach. it reminds me of my first three years of college when i was discovering that there was so much great music out there, but smetimes you have to dig it out. they wear their emotions on their sleevs and are brutaly honest. corin tucker shredds her voice, and while some don't seem to like it, i think it's one of the most distinctive voices in the past 15 years. loud, yet vulnerable. i've seen them live twice here in chapel-hill, and they blew the roof off the place. this music reminds me of the freedom bands should have to TRULY express themselves. this is the one to start with, then move on to the fantastic "call the doctor". ... Read more


3. All Hands on the Bad One
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Asin: B00004RD8V
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 26728
Average Customer Review: 4.52 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com's Best of 2000

It has all the blistering guitar work, punk-rock harmonies, andthunderous drumming of their previous efforts. But with All Hands on the BadOne, the Northwest trio of Sleater-Kinney doesn't forget to have fun, too.Their sound has evolved, but the spirit that forged the seminal riot-grrrlthreesome animates every anthem here. --Jason Verlinde ... Read more

Reviews (84)

5-0 out of 5 stars First great album of the new millenium
With "All Hands on the Bad One," Sleater-Kinney have joined rocks elite -- with four consecutive solid albums in four years, they have become as efficient and productive as certain grand groups in their prime like the Beatles, the Stones ('68-'72), the Velvet Underground, Bob Dylan ('64-'67), Patti Smith ('75-'78), Prince ('81-'87) etc. Who would have thought they would be able to top "Call the Doctor" and "Dig Me Out"? "All Hands" takes the best parts from "Dig Me Out" and "The Hot Rock" (the least effective of their last four records) and somehow manages to sound poppier ("The Ballad of a Ladyman," "Leave You Behind"), sexier ("Milkshake n' Honey") and more political ("#1 Must Have") all in one leap. S-K's lyrics have become more lyrical, more poetic, more ambiguous, more daring. Corin Tucker's singing is more inventive than ever, and harmonies on songs like "You're No Rock n' Roll Fun" and "Leave You Behind" approach Beach Boys quality. What in the world will they do next?

4-0 out of 5 stars Now Is The Time To Invent
It's been a fun ride over the past few years, watching the evolution of Sleater-Kinney from a fairly standard riot grrrl group (still, it was always easy to spot the talent) to the absolute indie pop rock masters they are today. And here's the really amazing thing about Sleater-Kinney: their sound isn't all that revolutionary. There's a lot of Sonic Youth in here, and at times Carrie's Rickenbacker gives the songs a strange R.E.M./Pylon feel. So, no, they're not reinventing the wheel, but they play with such passion that you can't help but take notice. Janet's one of the best drummers around, Carrie's easily my favorite guitarist today and Corin-- Ah, Corin-- she just wraps her voice around words, turning them inside out, twisting two syllable words into six. They just compliment each other perfectly...

The lyrics have improved with each album an not coincidentally it seems like each album has been better than the last (although I still count The Hot Rock as my favorite S-K album). All Hands On The Bad One has all the feel of that last warm-up album before all hell breaks loose and Sleater-Kinney takes over the entire country the way Nirvana did in the early 90's. Maybe that's too much pressure to put on them, but All Hands proves they may be ready for it. It expands on the pop hooks they've honed over Dig Me Out and The Hot Rock, adding hand claps and more harmonies and, in the process, coming dangerously close to Veruca Salt territory on pop gems like You're No Rock In Roll Fun, the title track, and Leave You Behind.

Other highlights (for me): The sexy Milkshake n Honey building to a knee-quivering climax, the relentless Ironclad asking the musical question "What would you kill to make a heart stand still?", the social #1 Must Have lamenting today's music culture ("Watch me make up my mind instead of my face"), and the near-lullaby The Swimmer which is the most fragile song S-K has ever recorded, with the possible exceltion of The Hot Rock's The Size Of Our Love.

You know, I hope my enthusiasm for Sleater-Kinney has come across in this review. We're really witnessing something pretty special here, folks. Don't miss it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful wonderful wonderful.
This is a great album, to just start out. It's songs are polished, yet still maintain the level of fun that Sleater-Kinney has been developing since their self-titled debut. With the single (whose video even got some airplay), You're No Rock 'N Roll Fun, it's just probably one of the most fun, catchy songs that you'll hear. The Ballad of a Ladyman has a sophisticated cello underneath the vocals that just scratch the surface of the themes that Corin Tucker, Carrie Brownstein, and Janet Weiss will explore in this album. The feminism ideals in this album aren't in your face, but instead some of the most practical things you'll hear. #1 Must Have exposes the mindset of the modern feminist, spending their days getting fueled up by feminists' websites. And The Professional! Besides detailing the modern female worker, it's just a killer song. Although only a minute and a half long, this tune is just amazing. And when you hear Carrie Brownstein go "shalalalala" towards the end, it's confirmed that although this band is smart and sophisticated, fun details like that aren't out of place.
Basically. Get this album. Sleater-Kinney has other great albums, but this is the first one I purchased, and it really made me begin to appreciate the talent of the three ladies of Sleater-Kinney.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Punk rock Dixie Chicks.
I just told you, A punk rock Dixie Chicks!!

3-0 out of 5 stars diamonds in rough...
Personally I think that all Sleater-kinney albums have their own style. There were a few songs that really grabbed my attention like Ladyman, Youth Decay and Milkshake and Honey. Some of the album seems less exciting but its all about your preference. Its almost a blend of Dig Me Out (their slightly punkish album) and the Hot Rock. If you think this album is great make sure you listen to the Hot Rock! (its the best!) ... Read more


4. Bricks Are Heavy
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Asin: B000002LRV
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 22422
Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Somewhat poppier than their previous album, Bricks Are Heavy still features the abrasive guitar riffs and punk inflections that gained L7 their following. "Pretend We're Dead" was the major hit from this album, and is the most commercial song of the lot; songs like "Wargasm&quot, "Everglade", and "Slide" are aggressive, roaring rockers. While "Diet Pill" and "This Ain't Pleasure" emphasize the group's feminist slant, this takes a backseat to their music, which is the main reason to pick up this album. L7 isn't women who play rock and roll; it's a rock and roll band that happens to be made up of women. --Genevieve Williams ... Read more

Reviews (10)

5-0 out of 5 stars Thank you MTV, for the only good thing you ever did for me
The year was 1992, and I had never heard of L7. I was up watching 'Headbanger's Ball' (For those of you who don't know, MTV used to play rock videos, and at midnight on Saturday, heavy metal and hard rock videos were played). I was excited because Dio had just gotton back with Black Sabbath, and they were going to premeir their new video from 'Dehumanizer'. Anyway before they came on Ricky Rachman was talking to two girls in the studio, their names were Jennifer Finch, and Suzi Gardner. They were talking about their new album 'Bricks are Heavy', then they showed the video 'Pretend we're Dead'. From that moment I was hooked.

Eight years later I have all their albums, autographs, and T-shirts. I've seen them in concert four times and can't get enough of them. L7 will blow away most bands that are playing this modern, watered down version of hard rock-n-roll. 'Bricks' is an excellent album, and is highly recommeded for anyone curious about L7 without knowing any of their material. All their albums are great, but I don't have a favorite, they all stand up honorably on their own.

Also catch L7 performing as 'The Camel Lips' on the movie 'Serial Mom'.

4-0 out of 5 stars Smells heavy.
I don't know if I'd call "Bricks Are Heavy" their best album, but it's definitely their most popular. Propelled by the song "Pretend We're Dead", and released when "The Donnas" were still in grade school, this is the album that exposed most people to "L7". It's punk, grunge, metal, and pop all at the same time. I wish alot of guys played this well, and with so much heart. Other awesome songs on here are "One More Thing" and "Diet Pill", which includes my favorite lyrics "Calgon can't take me away". Though all their other albums equally rock, I haven't heard much from them recently. It might be time for a "Best Of". Hopefully they tour again soon, I wanna catch a tampon.

5-0 out of 5 stars grungey, grrly, groovy and just plain amazing
You need this CD!
L7 is set apart from the rest of the grunge and grrl movement. Others can not compare, the style is completely different from Hole, Nirvana and the rest.

Buy it!!!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars One of my most influential cds in the past decade
Courtney Love has nothing on the women of L7 and never had. L7 was the wake up call I needed back in the early '90s when music was still stuck with that godawful glam metal scene. Nirvana never really did anything for me except for killing the careers of Warrant, Poison, and their ilk (thank heavens for that!). Bands like Nirvana and L7 were the antithesis of the overindulgent hair metal scene which had at the time worn out its welcome. I discovered L7 in an issue of Rolling Stone magazine (which ironically had Nirvana on the cover). I don't remember what the two paragraph long article said about L7 but I knew that my curiousity was piqued. I was looking for new music. Music that wasn't wimpy like Warrant and Poison. A few days later, I bought a cassette copy of "Bricks Are Heavy". I was completely blown away by what I heard. The music was equally as loud, abrasive, and intense as Nirvana's but with four talented women. Everything I thought I knew about music went out the door. I immediately embraced L7's music. Little did I knew then that then unknown producer Butch Vig would go on to becoming a member of one of my all time favorite bands Garbage. "Bricks Are Heavy" is a testament to Butch's talents as a record producer. He kept the music raw and unpolished. As heavy and raw as the music is, the songs are incredibly catchy but without being overpolished. I wore out my cassette copy of "Bricks Are Heavy" within a matter of weeks. I played that sucka to death. As I am listening to the album again for the first time in a few years, I am quickly reminded what made me fall in love with the band's music. All the songs are great. I loved every single song. When I saw the band perform live at Lollapalooza '93 (or was it '92?), I immediately got into the mosh pit and went wild to songs like "Everglade" and "Pretend We're Dead". I wish there were more bands like L7 today and less of bands and artists like Limp Bizkit, Creed, and Avril Lavigne.

5-0 out of 5 stars GRRL Rock!
Makes you feel great to be a GRRL! One of their best albums! ... Read more


5. Call the Doctor
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Asin: B00000219M
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 30558
Average Customer Review: 4.48 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Sleater-Kinney's musical manifesto is a wake-up call to not only the old boy network, but to young women who find themselves increasingly at odds with it. Helmed by Corin Tucker (Heaven's To Betsy) and Carrie Brownstein (Excuse 17), this trio is not only furious and formidable, but genuinely significant. On a musical landscape populated by open sewers like The 7 Mary Bush Pilots Idiot-Grunge Revival or Hootie's Home for the Terminally Bland and Sensitive, Tucker's spine-shivering voice shrieking "I wanna be your Joey Ramone / Pictures of me on your bedroom door" cracks through the narcotic haze of mediocrity like a rat tail on a bare bottom. When she declares herself "The Queen of Rock & Roll," I'm inclined to smile and think "If only." Cultural importance aside, this rocks. Their eerily dead-on Sonic Youth snippet in "I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone" had me checking the credits for a Kim Gordon cameo, while "Little Mouth," "Stay Where You Are" and the incendiary title track are some of the most raging chunks of punk found around these parts since Greg Sage shook the rain off his rubbers. More than recommended: required. --John Chandler ... Read more

Reviews (21)

4-0 out of 5 stars 4½ stars if I could
Call the Doctor was the first Sleater-Kinney album I bought, and now I own them all and I've seen them in concert twice. Simply: if you're even considering buying this album, you should do it. It's virtually unparalleled as punk-pop, and you'd be hard-pressed to find a song with more energy than "Little Mouth", or a song that grows on you the way "I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone" will. If you've never heard Sleater-Kinney, their honesty and energy will blow you away. If you have, this record isn't as polished as The Hot Rock or Dig Me Out, but this album is distinguished from the others by the complete absence of filler -- every one's a keeper, and if a gem like the title track or the ones mentioned above happen to stand out, it's not for lack of competition.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Things
Before I begin, I should probably say that I'm not one of those annoying purists who cries "sell out!" at the first sign of a band developing sophistication or maturity. I like everything SK have done since CTD. That said, for all the virtues of later SK, in terms of sheer glorious pain, this goes unsurpassed.
What makes this album great is its rough edges, its potent mix of aggression, confusion, and naivete. I don't think they've done anything to match the visceral intensity of songs like "I'm Not Waiting" or "Anonymous" since. When Corin declares at the opening of the title track, "I'm your monster, I'm not like you", it's a moment of pure defiance, of realizing the pain of being an outsider and embracing it anyway. "Little Mouth" is more scathing and genuinely unsettling than anything Bikini Kill ever managed. "I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone" is jagged good fun. "Heart Attack" has the same tone of youthful, self-excoriating apathy you see in the best moments on In Utero.
But for me the defining moment of the album is the curious line at the end of "Taking Me Home", an incisive feminist rant against the social orthodoxy that posits women as commodities, either as wives or sex objects. But in a tired, confused, almost deadened voice, Corin sings, "I've got me mixed up with somebody else", adding a dimension of doubt and ambivalence to the song that might have otherwise been a little heavy-handed. It's this tension between rage and confusion that makes this such a brilliant soundtrack to anyone's messed-up adolescence. Cathartic bliss.

5-0 out of 5 stars Call The Doctor .
1. Call the Doctor (An "Okay" song.).
2. Hubcap (I love this song. They did a really good job on they're high notes.).
3. Little Mouth (Corin is just screaming in this song.).
4. Anonymous (A very fun song. Nothing you wanna hear before you go to bed.).
5. Stay Where You Are (An nice song if you wanna hear all three of them sing.).
6. Good Things (I really like this song "It's A Dumb Song, But I'll Right It Anyway".).
7. I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone (They screamed a lot in this one too "Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah".).
8. Taking Me Home (This song is a very fun song.).
9. Taste Test (I like the really light voice"Where are you now?".).
10. My Stuff (I can never hear what they're saying "Leave me without a god without belief without a cause
without a path that I should take
without a choice that I should make
such an easy thought and now I had it but I lost it
I guess I need your help and now I
guess I need your help and now I" .).
11. I'm Not Waiting (This song is Okay. Not they're best, but who cares?).
12. Heart Attack (A really light song. Very nice sounding.).

Altogether it's an Okay album.

4-0 out of 5 stars Close to Perfection!
Before I begin, I must let you know where I am coming from, I am a gay African-American male, very much into punk/alternative/whateva it's called these days. My introduction to SK came at a time when I was invovled in a BAD relationship and I happened to hear some talk about how good it was, so I decided to check it out.

IT IS BETTER THAN GOOD! It's EXCELLENT! From the stanza of "Call The Docotor" ... "they want to socialize you....dignify, analyze, terrorize you" I was hooked! Who wouldn't be? SK personifies all the emotions of any under-dog of society (or so they make us out to be), no matter who they may be (female, abused, ethinic, etc.) and screams, plays and ROCKS them into a complete fruition of being. This band should have gotten a Grammy for this fine example of punk rock agression mixed with sympathetic/empathetic emotion.

Then I heard "Good Things" and my world transformed. I instantly related the song to my current state and found the strength to move on to something more productive and healthy besides a messed up (I'm being quite tame) realtionship. "Getting better, worse, I cannot tell..." says it all. "Why do good things never want to stay?", well, I guess I will never know the answer to that, but thanks to SK I know that even the bad has an alternate side that will sometimes purge itself out. "This time I wiil be alright, this time I will be ok..." are words that I will take with me to my grave.

This band was able to transcend pure enlightment to me in the course of a CD....do I need to say more? Did I mention the other songs? I don't even need too.

Just buy it! It's well worth it!

4-0 out of 5 stars Close to Perfection!
My introduction to SK came at a time when I was invovled in a BAD relationship and I happened to hear some talk about how good it was, so I decided to check it out.

IT IS BETTER THAN GOOD! It's EXCELLENT! From the stanza of "Call The Docotor" ... "they want to socialize you....dignify, analyze, terrorize you" I was hooked! Who wouldn't be? SK personifies all the emotions of any under-dog of society (or so they make us out to be), no matter who they may be (female, abused, ethinic, etc.) and screams, plays and ROCKS them into a complete fruition of being. This band should have gotten a Grammy for this fine example of punk rock agression mixed with sympathetic/empathetic emotion.

Then I heard "Good Things" and my world transformed. I instantly related the song to my current state and found the strength to move on to something more productive and healthy besides a messed up (I'm being quite tame) realtionship. "Getting better, worse, I cannot tell..." says it all. "Why do good things never want to stay?", well, I guess I will never know the answer to that, but thanks to SK I know that even the bad has an alternate side that will sometimes purge itself out. "This time I wiil be alright, this time I will be ok..." are words that I will take with me to my grave.

This band was able to transcend pure enlightment to me in the course of a CD....do I need to say more? Did I mention the other songs? I don't even need too.

Just buy it! It's well worth it! ... Read more


6. One Beat
list price: $15.98
our price: $13.99
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Asin: B000069DOG
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 14176
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

For all the noisy bluster involving plastic barrettes, thrift-store guitars, and caterwauling political catchphrases, Sleater-Kinney have always been pragmatic about their music. The group's self-titled debut got by on ferocity alone. But each successive release has exhibited a dramatic step forward as youthful exuberance gives way to melody and poise. One Beat is the trio's most assured work yet. A jubilant blast of tambourines, theremin, and Corin Tucker's rubber-band vocals usher in the spiky "Oh!," the Strokes' locker-room diffidence mingles with Sonic Youth's angular cool on "Prisstina," and the title track, all urgent wailing and power chords, rumbles with pure excitement. The rest of the album isn't far behind. --Aidin Vaziri ... Read more

Reviews (40)

4-0 out of 5 stars imperfect symmetry
"One Beat" isn't exactly a departure for veteran indie rock trio Sleater-Kinney. But that's not exactly a bad thing.

The band still plays through multiple time signatures with ease, gets lost in excitedly sparse guitar chords and beat on brat drum rolls, and Corrin Tucker still thrusts her voice out front like Patti Smith in an earthquake. But what makes them different-and what has always made them different-is that they resemble less their peers than they do fellow ground-breaking bands like The Talking Heads, The Clash, and Devo. In fact, upon first listen someone asked candidly, "Rush?"

The title track suggests the mechanism for the music. Lines like, "take me to the source of chaos / let me be the butterfly / imperfect symmetry has underlining poetry and rhyme," provide a perfect description of the band's sound-part beauty, melody and pop, and part beastly comedowns and sonic franticism. Sure the base of their sound is still formulaic power pop, but between those lines exist full-on Beach Boy breakdowns complete with crystal clear harmonies, soaring keyboard driven choruses worthy of The Cars, and an endless amount of unraveling guitars. Add to that, the expanded sound provided by keys, theremin, trumpet, and string section, and you've got something far beyond the usual punk-pop girl group.

The lyrics, usually either warbled by Tucker, or purred by fellow guitarist Carrie Brownstein, range from the dismally personal ("nobody lingers like your hand on my heart") to the sarcastically nationalistic ("if you love your country, go out and spend some cash") to the clean universal ("why can't I get along?").

Still the issues addressed are genuine, and are sung with an unfailing passion. "Since when is skepticism un-American?" questions the sardonically post 9-11 "Combat Rock." "Her only job was to not grow old," declares "Hollywood Ending," and "I've got this curse on my tongue / all I taste is rust," confesses the exquisite closer, "Sympathy."

Those kind of lyrics alone would be enough to lift most band beyond any state of normalcy. But the overall consistency of their music, the sheer originality, and the impassioned approach is what made Sleater-Kinney a household name among indie rock enthusiasts in the first place. And there's certainly nothing on "One Beat" to call that crown into question.

5-0 out of 5 stars The ladies of rock.
This was the first Sleater-Kinney album I picked up, shortly after its release. I live in NYC and heard that this album dealt more or less directly with 9/11, which rather screwed with my head. This, of course, in no way makes me unique, but it basically meant that I was going on a review and nothing else. I had no idea what Sleater-Kinney was about, or their sound, or anything.
One Beat is a truly excellent album, the sort that makes you say, "I wish I wrote that," even if you're not a musician (I'm not). The lyrics of the fight songs are concise and honest, but the most striking thing about the album, especially if you're unfamiliar with S-K, is the way that Corin Tucker uses her voice almost like a percussion instrument, and the way that Carrie Brownstein sings backing vocals that are basically another verse being sung at the same time on many tracks. This is evident from the very first track, an immensely powerful song that was really unlike anything I'd ever heard 'til then. The album has some anti-war anthems on it, but the ladies really run the spectrum as far as topics go - one song rocks harder than you can believe, the next is a heart-breaking ballad (S-K is good for one tear-jerker an album, I've found), and the next a mellow rocker.
I listen to a lot of music, and I've got to say that One Beat is an album I recommend without hesitation. The ladies are touring briefly this spring, and then are planning a release later this year. One Beat is a world away, stylistically, from All Hands on the Band One (another good album, and one that many think is their best effort, but either I'm not getting it, or the fact that One Beat was my introduction to them has blinded me to the possibility that their earlier stuff was better - although Call the Doctor is another great album), and I'm looking forward to what their new stuff may be like.

5-0 out of 5 stars Should I run your rockets to the stars?
It's the type of insurgent call to arms that went out of style twenty years ago, but its unaplogetic sense of politics is only the first thing to treasure about One Beat. Corin Tucker's trademark wail is, at this point, such a refined, astonishing instrument, when she gives it full soul rein in "Sympathy," there's a sense of intimacy that is overwhelming and unforgettable. Within the record, though, is protest of the best kind - "One Beat," "Step Aside," and especially the Clash-channeling "Combat Rock" may be the best pieces of contemporary music to comment on contemporary issues out there, probably because they're the only band daring to speak, or, in this brilliant album's case, scream.

5-0 out of 5 stars Truly beautifully angry
The best album I've heard from Sleater Kinney and one of the best albums I've heard in years.
The music is driven and forceful. It grabs you by the ears and, shakily screaming, pours it heart and soul into you. It's a tight grip and there's no letting go.
And yet, with all it's intensity, the music is full of beauty. Truth, whatever that may be, seems to linger and shimmer around the perfectly ragged edges. At times, you might find yourself misty-eyed without knowing why.
I had the chance, years ago before I even knew who Sleater Kinney were, to see them in concert. After hearing One Beat I've never regretted more throwing that chance away.

5-0 out of 5 stars Way good.
OK, so I'm not the best at reviewing albums to which I have an intense emotional attachment, but here goes nothing...

I bought Dig Me Out because it was a curiosity as to why I didn't own any Sleater-Kinney albums to date, based on my general taste. And loved it! I bought One Beat shortly after it came out, not having heard any criticisms-even amateur ones. Slowly, but surely, I began to love One Beat even more than Dig Me Out.

I've always thought that many a' music fan's focus on technical prowess over a band or artist's ability to touch the audience emotionally (i.e., hoarding all of Van Halen's albums because Eddie is just so damn good despite the overwhelming goofiness of the band as a whole). However, I find Sleater-Kinney's pure talent to be truly, and some would argue, finally showcased in this album, and that is certainly to their credit. Every aspect of this album should blow everyone's mind-technically.

In short, One Beat provides the perfect blend of unbelievably good writing with soul-wrenching truth. My husband and I saw them in concert last spring on their tour to support this album. We went home and had the greatest sex of our lives. ... Read more


7. The Woods
list price: $14.98
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Asin: B0008FPIOU
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 2195
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

After its most prolonged absence from the recording studio, Sleater-Kinney has reloaded with a smoldering rock and roll record that rivals John Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band and Nirvana’s In Utero in terms of unexpectedness. It is a 180-degree proclamation to the album which came before it. Producer David Fridmann (Weezer, Flaming Lips) coaxed the Portland, OR trio to retool its approach to making music. The results are startling and far and away the most collaborative, experimental and risky in the band’s seven-record career. Corin Tucker’s supreme guttural form is on display from the lead-off track "The Fox"--a would-be children’s tale overridden by crunching power chords and drummer Janet Weiss’s battering percussion. The Woods tugs on your ear musically and stabs at your heart lyrically on riff-wielding jaunts "Wilderness," "Modern Girl" and "Rollercoaster." The live-in-one-take, 11-minute blockbuster "Let’s Call It Love" unleashes Carrie Brownstein’s foray into guitar-solo psychedelic. Haven’t heard Sleater-Kinney yet? Try Dig Me Out and work your way forward. Already on board? Find a steady chair, feel your ears bleed and watch your speakers disintegrate. --Scott Holter ... Read more

Reviews (22)

5-0 out of 5 stars THE WOODS?MORE LIKE ENTRACE TO THE WILDERNESS OF GREATNESS
HEAVIER, LOUDER, UNCUT.ACTUALLY ITS CUT BUT IT IS HEAVIER.I MEAN THE ACTUAL ALBUM ART ITSELF WEIGHS IT DOWN BY A GOOD 6-7 GRAMS, NO JOKE.

FIVE STARS.

5-0 out of 5 stars A new and improved (in ways!) Sleater-Kinney
My initial reaction to the first few seconds of the album was, "How can this fit in Sleater-Kinney's arsenal?" These seconds are filled with raw, grungy, distorted guitars and pounding, bass-heavy drums. This helps me, a devoted fan even in self-titled days, understand why after four relatively successful albums on Kill Rock Stars they would switch to Sub Pop, the label that put out some of the early Soundgarden and Nirvana albums.

When the vocals entered in the first track, "Fox," I was taken back to Sleater-Kinney's world. Corin's vocals are just as simultaneously wild and controlled as ever. As she sang the words, "land-ho!" I imagined she must have been sitting on a vibrating chair in the recording studio.

The second track, "Wilderness," is typical Sleater-Kinney with Hot Rock guitars and Carrie and Corin doing what seems like vocal impressions of each other. "Jumpers" has the classic-to-Sleater-Kinney desperate feel. "Modern Girl" is cheesy at best. "Rollercoaster" has a fun, almost go-go feel to it. "Let's Call it Love," in its eleven minutes, reminds me of the type of humor in which the joke gets so monotonous and annoying that you hate it, and just then, it gets hilarious again. Track placement should have called for "Let's Call it Love" as an ender instead of "Everything," which would be a better song if they weren't putting the album-ender pressure on it.

4-0 out of 5 stars Very good. 4.5 stars
My impressions: Sleater Kinney listeners will be taken by the freshness of the sound, the different mix. I was wowed! It sounds like the songs were recorded on one track -- it's very organic, yet mature. Underneath all the excitement surrounding a new album though, I'd say this album's quality is about the same as One Beat. I LOVE One Beat; there's not really a weak song on it. The Woods has moments of sheer brilliance and Mrs. Carrie Brownstein's six string investigates new territory not explored by SK previously. The drums are savage and complex. And I got chills once or twice at Corin's wail (love that passionate voice). "Laaaand ho!" Overall, SK remain head and shoulders above most acts today. Definitely worth the money.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Woods
Mostly very good, though in many places the guitars are mixed way above the vocals, maybe too much. "Modern Girl" is a production disaster, though--a distorted harmonica track? Ugh. "Entertain" falls into that marching-band-drummer thing that Janet Weiss sometimes seems to get stuck in. The bonus DVD was rockin', though the last track could have been recorded better.

5-0 out of 5 stars Seven albums strong.....
This album is a must-have for any music lover who chooses to see past the blights of American Idol and Britney Spears. For new fans, the band often takes a couple listens but they are worth it. For old fans, get ready to rock with Carrie's stellar guitar and a Sonic Youth-esque jam on "Let's Call it Love".

I have been a fan for about 6 years now and I can honestly say "The Woods" blows everything else out of the water. The lyrics have changed drastically from "One Beat's" overt (though justified) finger-flipping towards Bush. Instead, they come back with nuanced poetry that is far more venomous and subtle.
"The Woods" proves that Sleater-Kinney has that rare ability (ala Sonic Youth and Beck) to always sound like themselves whilst releasing dynamic new albums. Definitely worthy of the title "Rock Album". ... Read more


8. The Hot Rock
list price: $14.98
our price: $13.99
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Asin: B00000HF6J
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 5613
Average Customer Review: 4.27 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com's Best of 1999

Everyone knew that Sleater-Kinney were capable of creating some intense (and infectious) blasts of punk and pop, but in 1999 they finally got the production treatment they deserved. The Hot Rock, a sometimes furious--but always catchy--disc of pop-punk, is one of the Northwest trio's best. --Jason Verlinde ... Read more

Reviews (81)

5-0 out of 5 stars Carrie Rocks My World
When "All Hands on the Bad One" came out I got sick of seeing headlines such as "Sleater Kinney Returns." They didn't return because they never went anywhere; in fact, I would argue that "The Hot Rock" shows the band at their best. The songs on the Hot Rock are more structured and polished than on "Dig Me Out" or "All Hands," both in how they are performed and produced. The guitar interplay between Carrie and Corrin is wonderful as are their occassional dual vocals. Corrin's shrill warble rarely annoys as it does on other albums. But Carrie Brownstein's guitar--her great riffs and abundant ideas--carry the day (no pun intended). Track after track hit you with an exhilirating punch. Every time I listen to "Get Up" I think it's the best song ever recorded (excuse my Albiniesque exaggeration).

The argument that the songs lack cohesion does hold a little bit of weight--on a few tracks the songs shift from rousing riffs and punkish vocals to girl group sing-along choruses. This does disconcert a little, but ultimately is not much of a liability.

Yes, it's less a punk album than the fine "Dig Me Out" or the overrated "All Hands on the Bad One," but if that's where this band excels, I can only hope they'll retun to this form.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent
The first time I heard Sleater-Kinney I was immediately hooked on Corin Tucker's voice, the unbridled yell, so honest and pure indicated that here was a group with something different. When I first played The Hot Rock, I relaxed in the soothing familiar territory I had been exposed to, but this was something different. Dig Me Out was the gates of the minds of these three women, The Hot Rock is the center of that. At first listen, I thought they had proceeded past their prime, but these women are only beginning to realize themselves. Carrie Brownstein's guitar electrifies with precision, Janet's drums keep the songs together, without her the songs would not work. Not only do we get to hear the energy of Corin's voice, but Carrie Brownstein comes in to many songs, often inter-weaving voices, which is so natural that it becomes one whole part, one person alone. Carrie's solo effort on the album, The Size of Our Love, is so brutally honest I only hope she contributes more in later albums. Not only have Sleater-Kinney have grown, and become one whole group, they are now just hitting their stride. This is what music is about, conveying thoughts and actions into sound. Sleater-Kinney do it so brilliantly I am grateful to be able to experience their music, and only hope people will realize that these three women comprise one of the greatest bands of the decade.

5-0 out of 5 stars I felt so alone thinking this was their best
Glad to see others thought so - i'd hate to have an isolated opinion on something.

Get up was the song i heard on CMJ's collection that sold me on SK. I think the whole album is priceless - $12 at the concert was therefore a good deal.

They're very tight live - play their asses off.

5-0 out of 5 stars Corina!!
this band has a cute singer, Corina with chipmunk cheeks. She sounds like Belinda Carlile. I just want to pinch her cheeks!!

5-0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Album
By the release of "The Hot Rock" in '99, it was clear that Sleater-Kinney had arrived at an unprescedentedly intricate sonic asthetic; contrapuntal and angular, yet ferociously contained, thier attack lies in the constant tension between the band's two stellar leads--listening to Carrie Brownstein and Corin Tucker sing thier often conflicting lines simultaneously is to be privy to a fascinating, constantly evolving relationship, one where the urge to support and celebrate one another is continually challenged by a dynamic in which each little bit of emotional real estate that's offered as a gesture of compromise is burdened with world-historic import. Of coarse, all this staggeringly cerebral conceptual metaphor slinging would be dull as door knobs if it weren't for the band's talent as musicians and songwriters; that S-K can cram enough of this stuff to fullfill several senior thesis requirements into music so gloriously engaging, kinetic, and just plain rockin' is a testament to just how important this band is. Few have operated so proficiently on simultaneous levels of chops, content and execution. As a guitarist, Carrie Brownstein has more chops than Paul Bunyon, creating the most arresting, original guitar sound since Peter Buck or The Edge (or Pete Townshend, or Tom Verlain--pick one, the point is, the woman's GOOD) Rarely playing anything that resembles a traditional riff, her arsenal of quicksilver leads and choppy, percussive arpeggios give S-K's music and incredibly elastic, unpredictable quality the makes their records among the most listenable in rock. Corin Tucker, on the other hand, is mostly voice, but what a voice it is--a riveting, ennervating force of nature that gives visceral physicality and unforgettable conviction to her lyrics. She may have the best set of pipes in rock. Then there's Janet Weiss--not doubt one the best drummers in rock, slamming all this stunning musicianship into orbit with unshakable consistancy. You can hear all this loud and clear on "The Hot Rock", and if this album lacks the breathless rush of thier previous effort, "Dig Me Out", well, that's only disappointing if you expected them to reinvigorate rock twice in a row. On this record, the band intorduces several directions they could go in, and they're all thrilling to contemplate---"Start Together" is a surging anthem, so full to bursting with righteous conviction and sure-footed authority they could sustain an entire album of these(others in this vien include the blistering "God Is A Number", where Corin nearly turns her voice inside-out, and "The End Of You" an impossibly ingenious song that equates navigating the music biz on a tiny, proud indie label with pirates on the open sea.) Contrasting this angle are bracingly subdued songs like the aching "Don't Talk Like", with lines like "there's a part of me/ that works just like a child" aiming strait for the heart strings, and "The Size of Our Love", sung by Carrie, that takes on the tricky subject of love and faithfulness in the face of death with out a hint of cliche or sentitiousness. "Burn, Don't Freeze" is head-spinningly complex, "Banned From The End Of The World" is infectiously bouncy, and "Memorize Your Lines" is stunningly evocative, with a lush bed of cellos and florid, almost gothic atmosphere. "One Song For You" throws a perfect little temper tantrum at the end, with the band revving up behind Corin as she drops the kiss-off line of the century, educated-punk-grrl division: "drop little boy crumbs you could follow back/ when you get lost becoming a man." Ouch, Corin. Very ouch. The other songs that I haven't specifically drooled over are great, as well. Suffice it to say that this record [isn't bad]. ... Read more


9. Sleater-Kinney
list price: $14.98
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Asin: B00000219K
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 94919
Average Customer Review: 4.56 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (9)

4-0 out of 5 stars If you like Call the Doctor....
I had the interesting juxtaposition of buying this album and seeing SK live for the first time within the same week. (It's lonely being a SK fan in Australia. Hardly anyone's heard of them, and their early albums are near impossible to find.) Anyway, while their live show was amazing, I was struck by that strange sense of displacement experienced by any obsessed fan at a concert - the band that seemed to exist solely to nurse your adolescent anguish in your bedroom are suddenly on a stage, unreachable, impersonal, and, well, glamorous. SK have become more palatable over the years - now they're more sophisticated, more stylish, more self-assured, and less politically extreme. Thankfully, they've managed to make that inevitable transition while still making compelling art - One Beat is a fantastic record. Still, something is lost in that forward-motion (not that same thing as selling out, mind you), and it's here in all its glory on this self-titled debut. On this record, and on Call the Doctor, SK were blessed with a wonderful lack of self-consciousness (the very thing that mars the uninspired All Hands On The Bad One.) This record is raw, immediate, direct, and naked. Sure, it's crude sometimes, and flawed, and brief, but it's impossible to question the sincerity, even if you don't like the politics, and while the militant feminism, bloodcurdling screams, and guitars that seem to simulate a monotone of dread are probably enough to alienate 99% of the human population, I'll love SK forever for having had the guts to make it. They seem like an entirely different band now, which leaves me with a sense of ambivalence: I'm glad they're becoming a real force to be reckoned with, that they're shiny and elegant and all grown up, that they're moving beyond their marginal status and seem more at peace with themselves and with men. But I think, deep down, I like my heroines a bit scrappier, a bit more unsure of themselves, a bit more messed up. Sometimes I think SK's flaws were their very virtues, and I worry that the more polished they become, the less powerful they are.

5-0 out of 5 stars Gut-punching, anti-phallus rock
An acquired taste, this CD took a while to accept, but now it's on heavy rotation. Very thought provoking, powerful debut.
This album is enjoyable on its own but is especially fun when you compare it to One Beat or The Hot Rock. Such contrast is a testament to a band's evolution.

4-0 out of 5 stars Sublime debut
Sleater-Kinney,America's foremost trio of femme-punk furies,have always excelled at playing it cool and tough while retaining a strong sense of what thier testosterone-addled dude-rock contemporaries would likely term "icky girlie-ness"Stylistically,thier songs are full of proud sugar-and-spice signifiers:spirited playground chants,60s girl-group allusion,preciously campy vocal asides.But this could also describe any of a number of bands with similer elements in the Riot-Grrrl movement of the early 90s,a musical and political ground-swell that by 95(when this record dropped) was quickly becoming stagnant under the burden of it's own narrow views and dependance on familiar cliches.Sleater-Kinney's eponymous debut shows thier shrewdness in patently avoiding the same trap,while remaining true to the original idealogical thrust.The record is a brisk,rapid affair(clocking in at just under thirty minutes),but it manages an astonishing eclecticism and versatility:for every primal rager("Don't Think You Wanna","Sold Out"),there's a stunning,almost pastoral slow-burner("Slow Song","Lori's Song").Musically,the trio is astounding self-assured(especially for a debut).Guitarist-vocalist Corin Tucker,Guitarist-Vocalist Carrie Brownstien,and then-drummer Lori Macfarlane whip up a sound that is a miracle of cohesion,economy,and surging momentum.Tucker and Brownstien are a perfect compliment to each other here,both instrumentally and vocally;listening to the record is like eaves-dropping on an intimate conversation between two friends with a complicated,fascinating relationship.This makes for music that is occasionally sublime:the criminally cool"The Day I Went Away" builds from sinister,slinky verses to full-on choruses with a breath-taking organic buzz;the jaw-dropping "Be Yr Mama"(possibly the band's pinnacle) is so brimming with tightly-coiled, whip-smart attitude and musical inventiveness it sounds primed to explode at any moment.This band has,of coarse,gone on to record four much-more heralded and beloved records,but for my money,they've only been improving and refining a staggeringly original and compelling style that they display in all it's glory here,and despite a few clunkers("How To Play Dead",which is musically clumsy and rushed but nevertheless rescued by Carrie's deliciously nasty hectoring)this debut firmly establishes this Olympia,Washington trio as one of the most important bands of the 90s.

3-0 out of 5 stars Whether you're tracing their roots or just want to rock
Listen to S-K's first for sheer, raw, feel-like-you're-at-the-club fun. If you're familiar with Sleater-Kinney you'll find it enjoyable to see the early stages of what they were up to. If not, you might as well start here and work your way up to their more polished work. Every time I put this on I feel like I'm in every punk/new wave club from the early-80s. There's a little X, a little Go-Gos and a little of Athens, GA's beloved Pylon and REM. But, best of all, there's a lot of every late 70's/early-80's DIY band that never made it farther than opening locally for the band that never made it farther than headlining locally, except S-K have real talent. The sonwgriting is formative but you can hear the ability there. The instruments are on the verge of very good but with enough garage quality to give it life. You can tell Janet Weiss was about to become a very strong drummer. And, even back then, Corin Tucker's screams, screeches and playful let-it-all-hang-out vocals were something unto themselves. If you haven't heard a band that plays what it plays for the sheer joy of it in a while, listen to this CD. It's crude, it's immature and it's a joy. Then get every S-K album you can lay your hands on. But one at a time, please. They deserve to be listened to. Plain and simple, this is rock and roll.

5-0 out of 5 stars good angry girl music!
yay for this one. its all like good and stuff... and i am glad there are some women out there that express their feelings toward pushy sex driven men. i like it lots. and you should too. she does a good job of screaming. shes got a pretty scream. anyway. buy it. listen to it. like it. then love it. ... Read more


10. The CD Version of the First Two Records
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Asin: B000003726
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 12713
Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (10)

5-0 out of 5 stars Sharp-edged melodic DC hardcore.
I've had this one spinning for a few weeks now. I got hooked by the song "feels blind," which appears on a Kill Rock Stars compilation (also excellent and highly recommended). I can't give this a 10 because not every song is great, although that kind of heightens the whole experience...I feel like I'm listening to a live show. The Fugazi influence is strong, but Kathleen's voice really gives it a different (good!) flavor. Feels Blind is still my favorite, although the last track is nice, and good to end the CD with. If you're like me, you saw Bikini Kill live in '91 and were not impressed. Pay no attention to these first impressions. There's something beyond cool about this band...I won't articulate it because I imagine it's vastly different for every listener. I'm getting ready to save up and buy all the following albums...

4-0 out of 5 stars girls who dont suck
this is great. the first song i heard by them was the amazing "suck my left one",their best song in my opinion.i went out and got the "singles" compilation and that was great.then i ordered this from c.d. now(ha!) and just got it today.i love it.its weird to listen to.so much passion and intensity,and my god its raw!i love that.they sound (musically) like "damaged" era black flag and nothing else.they pretty much invented this sound, or whatever you want to call it.all the songs are good,and the lyrics are amazing.as a guy however,it would be very ignorant of me to say that i could get this in the same way as a girl would.i suppose its the same thing as girls not being able to feel guy bands the same way we can.but,in a world and culture which is controled alomst exclusivly by men,where you almost never see or hear a womans perspective,this is a true force.again, as a guy,i find this to be at times,quite scary.its not view i have really ever been faced with before in my life,and just because of that fact,i can understand to some digree why they are so angry.ive got henry rollins and kurt cobain to express my pain,who do they girls have?britney spears?it makes you think.how do you control a group of people?keep them cut off from differing view points.ill tell you this,if girls were raised on this instead of what they have been,this world would be a very differant(and i bet you)a very better place.oh,and aside from all that, the songs rock!!

4-0 out of 5 stars we want REVOLUTION!
K, so BK is my favorite band so obviously I won't be too hard on them. This is probably my second favorite CD of theirs, I do prefer "Pussywhipped" but this one is great too. A lot more aggressive than later releases and more catchy songs.

1) Double Dare Ya- pretty good... eh, not much to say about that
2) Liar- EXCELLENT punky song, don't know about the random screaming that happens later in the track though
3) Carnival- very neat song, interesting drumbeat
4) Suck My Left One- MARVELLOUS!
5) Feels Blind- AHHHHHHH I HATE THIS SONG! i skip it every time
6) Thurston Hearts...- a lot of people don't like this song, but i think it's funny... they basically make fun of a reviewer who was making fun of them
7) White Boy- really good song, good message
8) This is Not a Test- kinda repetitive..mediocre
9) Don't Need You- righteous [feminine] power anthem
10) Jigsaw Youth- this song kinda bugs me
11) Resist Psychic Death- uh... what the hell is this song?
12) Rebel Girl- the worst rendition of this song ever! come on Kathleen, what were you thinking?
13) Outta Me- not very special

so there you have it, my wonderful unwanted, unrequested thoughts on this album. g'night.

5-0 out of 5 stars Revolutionized My Life
I purchased this CD in 1995 and still listen to it like it's brand new. The lyrics are encouraging and inspirational to women.

4-0 out of 5 stars Aaaaaaah
Perhaps not as essential as 'Pussywhipped', this is still a great collection of raw, revolutionary punk rock from Bikini Kill. ... Read more


11. Real Janelle
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Asin: B00000372K
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 160410
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Short & Sweet
This record is worth whatever price you may have to pay, if not purely for their cover of the Misfits' "Where Eagles Dare" - it's nothing like the original and yet it rocks just as hard. Okay, not as hard as the Misfits, but it's just as good. A must-have for the Bratmobile fan.
On a side note, if you came across this record because you're looking for Misfits' covers, may I suggest the Lemonheads' EP "Spanish Delights" (it's called something to that effect). On it, the 'heads cover "Skulls", in what may be the most hysterical, unlike-the-original cover ever. They also cover the Monkees and New Kids On the Block - you really should find it.

5-0 out of 5 stars bubblegumcandypop
Great record.Several great songs to keep you toes tapping and pop hooks so sweet your teeth hurt. ... Read more


12. My Body, the Hand Grenade
list price: $15.98
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Asin: B000003SWL
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 32472
Average Customer Review: 4.71 out of 5 stars
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Album Description

1997 anthology of rare & unreleased recordings from 1990- 1995. 14 tracks, including live versions of 'Drown Soda' & 'Asking For It', a previously unreleased cover of Donovan's 'Season Of The Witch' from MTV's Unplugged, a previously unreleased demo of 'Miss World' and more! A City Slang release. ... Read more

Reviews (42)

5-0 out of 5 stars sick punk rock that makes your skin crawl
What can I say about this album?This is beyond mindblowing.This cd satisfies my taste for the more punk,sick,early Hole that I love with a passion.Crazy and fantastic-and Im not talking only about Courtney!Courtney Love is a mastermind,and she can pull of rage and venom better than anyone ever in existance."Turpentine "just screams messed up and delicious."Dicknail" is quite possibly one of the most powerful,and impacting song on this disc."Burn Black"makes you cringe,makes you glad YOU'RE not the one that Courtney is screaming at,yet you enjoy the terror she imposes on her victim she's lashing out at."Drown Soda"has the most explosive,spectacular ending,with such paranoia and anger I didnt know what to do with myself when I first heard it."Old Age" is a surprisingly calm,articulate song,but the meaning and deep lyrics are not lost on you,they're magnified.I absolutely love this compilation.It's the missing link between "pretty on the Inside" and "Live Through This", showing the band's quick progression from the underground punk junk rock to the alternative grunge scene of the 90s.The inside of the booklet has some great photos of the band from 1990 to 1994 to 1996.Each incarnation is startling and drastic.Please go out and buy this cd,if you really truly are a Hole fan.This is the best album to get.You get early Hole stuff,to mid Hole,and late Hole,with new listens along the way.Trust me,there are versions and songs you have not ever heard anywhere else.BUY IT!

4-0 out of 5 stars "Starts out like magic, some sick religion..."
This CD is a collection of b-slides, live tracks (three of which are from MTV Unplugged), early singles, a demo, and an outtake. 'Turpentine', 'Phonebill Song', and 'Retard Girl' can all be found on 'The First Session'. 'Burn Black' was the b-slide to Hole's second single 'Dicknail'. 'Burn Black' is just messed up and crazy with interesting lyrics while 'Dicknail' is a great anti-misogynist anthem. Next is 'Beautiful Son' which was written about Kurt Cobain. It's a good song but sounds a little too cookie-cutter grunge. '20 Years In The Dakota' is one of the best songs on the CD. It was written about Yoko Ono. Up next we have the demo version of 'Miss World' which is more mellower with changed lyrics. Mediocre at best, Courtney sounds half-asleep when she's singing it. 'Old Age' is hands down the best song the CD. Very haunting and beautiful. The live tracks are all very good, but take some getting used to. My favorite live track is 'Season of The Witch' I love the haunting lyrics. So yes, if you are a Hole fan you'll definately want this CD. All of Hole's early singles are out of print and hard-to-find so I don't know where you could get them anywhere else. This CD is no longer in print but you can find it used online (that's what I did).

5-0 out of 5 stars My Body, the Hand Grenade
My Body, the Hand Grenade~ Hole is an eraly incarnation of hole. The tunes are raw, unpolished and a bit sleazy like a seedy bar. Yet this is not bad at all. In fact, I like it allot. The lyrics are inane and meaningless but one can not deny her dedication to her craft. A very good album.

5-0 out of 5 stars Love Her Or Hate Her, You Have To Respect Her
This is a strange album. A compilation of b-sides and rarities that your parents would call "ear-splitting electronic garbage."
This album is sheer genius. Sure, it is earsplitting and those not used to the noise might get a headache, but this is Courtney Love at her finest. This is a completely solid album, a wonderful anthology. There are no weak spots, there are no mistakes, there are no fillers. Let me explain.

1. Turpentine: Very, very early Hole and arguably the best. This song drips of malice and filth and sleaze. The guitars are very interesting, also.

2. Phonebill song: The loudest song on the record. Another early one, and very punk. There is nothing paticularly special about this song, but it's interesting to compare it to some of Hole's late stuff and see how they've grown.

3. Retard Girl: Hands down the best song on the album. It just SPEWS venom and cruelty. "God I hate that retard girl. . . HIT HER!" There are no facades with the song. Nor are there any apologies.

4. Burn Black: A very interesting song. The guitars will pierce your eardrums, but the song is a very important one. It has a strange neo-feminism that really isn't heard anywhere else.

5. Dicknail: This is one sick song. The lyrics are twisted and so are the guitars, but this album wouldn't be complete without it.

6. Beautiful Son: A slightly disturbing song. The music is bland and the lyrics are rather frightening. Not a personal favorite.

7. 20 Years In The Dakota: This song will blow your mind. It's sweet and demented at the same time. The tune is soothing, but the lyrics won't let you drift off.

8. Miss World: A demo version. It's quite different from the studio version. There's no, "I made my bed, I'll die in it" type-stuff and it's mellower.

9. Old Age: A gem. This one is achingly wistful and full of lament. This song is relaxing and I think Courtney was letting us have a glimpse into her life.

10. Softer, Softest: From MTV's unplugged. The lyrics are different, and in my opinion, a lot better.

11. He Hit Me, It Felt Like A Kiss: Also from MTV's unplugged. Very nice, good vocal work.

12. Season of the Witch: Also from MTV's unplugged. Catchy bass line. Creepy lyrics.

13. Drown Soda: Blistering. You'll be amazed by Courtney's scream when she gets to, "Watch me while I drown." It completely blew me away.

14. Asking For It: Another MTV performance. Nothing really special, but the band changes the song around. An interesting listen.

In conclusion, anyone who listens to music that doesn't suck, should have this in their collection. Forget Avril Lavigne. Let Courtney show you the way.

5-0 out of 5 stars An album of two halves
The first half of this album is dedicated to early Hole studio tracks, all of which are amazing and gut-wrenching. I can't pick a favourite, because they're all so good. The second half of the album contains demos and live tracks, and one that didn't make it onto "Live Through This", Old Age. This is a beautiful song with poignant lyrics. The closer is a glorified live version of "Asking For It", my favourite Hole song, which offers a novel interpretation of the song and leaves your head spinning. Not an album for the faint hearted, but for everyone else, it's highly recommended. ... Read more


13. L7
list price: $11.98
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Asin: B000001INO
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 141793
Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (5)

4-0 out of 5 stars O.K!!
I found their first cd very good! I love "metal stampede" and "ms 45"!! it's full of anger! It's power, adrenaline!! Not the best L7 album but....I LIKE IT

3-0 out of 5 stars Not for squares.
Released when "The Donnas" were still in elementary school, this sounds like what you would expect their debut to sound like. Raw, sloppy, and still pretty good. It's no "Hungry For Stink", but it's worth a listen for the "L7" fan. "Bite the Wax Tadpole" sounds like something from "Smell the Magic", and "Lets Rock Tonight" is just as good. My favorite by far is "Metal Stampede". One of my favorite "L7" songs. The rest is good, but not great. Die-hards should get this, casual fans go directly to "Bricks are Heavy".

1-0 out of 5 stars For hardcore L7 fans only
This record is so bad that founding members Donita Sparks and Suzi Gardner have completely disowned it and have retired it from their live shows. The record is hampered by the inept and lackluster drumming of Roy Koutsky, who was soon thrown out of the band for his unprofessional attitude. The material lacks any sort of focus or originality, and the only positive comment I can make is that the band's progress since then has been tremendous.

3-0 out of 5 stars Not bad debut, but a little unfocused
This album is not as good as it is interseting. L7 went into the studio a little half cocked I think. They did not have drummer Dee yet, so hired gun Roy Koutsky filled in. Listening to this record makes me think that they were in a rush to get this album done. The songs themselves are mostly good, but it is evident that L7 had not developed their style yet. They sound like they were still trying to find their musicical identity.

Bite the Wax Tadpole starts this album off (The literal Chinese translation of Coca-Cola is actually Bite the wax tadpole!). It's a punk song, along with the next track Cat-o-nine tails. From there the album becomes more diverse from the heavy 'Metal Stampede' to the cheese rock 'Running from the Law' and 'Let's rock tonight'. Suzy and Donita had their separate songs already written, they just performed enough of them together to make an album. Their music would become more recognizable starting with their next effort 'Smell the Magic'.

I cannot really catagorize any other L7 albums, rock/punk/metal/ to me it's 'L7' a style of it's own. Interestingly enough I've seen L7 in concert four times and they have never played any of the songs off this album live. Too bad songs like 'Uncle Bob' or 'I Drink' would go along well between 'I Need' and 'Fast and Frightening'. Buy this album if you are already familiar with the distinct style of L7, I think you'll be surprised.

5-0 out of 5 stars one of their best albums ever!!!!!
This is one of their lesser known albums. Comming out in 1988 they were one of the first of the Epitaph bands, before Epitaph was trendy. This is by far one of their hardest albums with some clasic anthems, such as Uncle Bob and Metal Stampede. They aren't just another female rock band they paved the way for alot of other rock/punk bands. Their 10 year rock career proves that. This album is a must for those how like punk rock! ... Read more


14. To Mother
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Asin: B0000018VT
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 105265
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars Pure punk rock genius
I just got this CD yesterday,and i've been listening to this non-stop. I even had a hard time sleeping,since I had song lyrics running through my head all night long!My absolute favorite is the cool,classic tough punk rock chick anthem "Catatonic",which has the catchiest lines ("one two three four five-glad youre not alive,six seven eight nine ten,back to hell again"),and the best vocals and instrumentals.My NEW favorite Babes in Toyland song."Laugh my Head Off" is another great song,along with"Spit to see the Shine," and "The QUiet Room".This album's version of"Mad Pilot" is easier to listen to than "Fontanelle's" version. "Ripe" is a classic Babes song,and its catchy and it rocks at the same time.The only sond I dont like is "primus" I love the instrumentals,I just don't like Lori Barbero's singing.This album is a definite 5,and even though I love the harsh "Spanking Machine" debut,this one is more melodic,yet it still retains the wildchild rock feel.Sometimes Kat's genius gets lost in overextended screams,and her lyrics are so deep and complex,but they do tend to get lost under he screaming.I know theyre punk,but sometimes its a shame.On "to Mother",Kat's voice takes on a whole new level,one that rivals "Fontanelle,"even though this record precedes it.ANyway,I recommend this album to anyone,espe first time Babes listeners.Go buy it you'll love it!

4-0 out of 5 stars 4 Stars but Definetly Worth Getting
Very raw and thrashy. It's so much fun to scream along too.

The songs you'll want to hear are: Catatonic, Mad Pilot (incorrectly listed as Map for some reason), Spit to See the Shine, and Quiet Room (instrumental).

The cd price alone is worth the song "Spit to See the Shine."

5-0 out of 5 stars One Of B.I.T.'s Best!
All songs exept for one on this EP are strong...

"Catatonic" is a spacy guitar rock-outer with an inconsistent pace & cool lyrics. "Mad Pilot" is the weak track, Kat screams incessantly and it's just too noisy for its own good. The next song is "Primus", which, I believe is one of Babes In Toyland's best songs. It starts off slow, and then kicks right into the most catchy riff and it's just overly wonderful. Then comes "Laugh My Head Off". Kat slurs the verses in the best way, then belts out the chorus terrifically, backed by a fantastic melody. The next two songs "Spit to See the Shine" and "Ripe" are also excellent tracks with astounding melodies as well. Finally, the album ends with a rough version of "The Quiet Room". I personally like this track better than the "Fontanelle" variation because it's not quite as smooth around the edges and is unfooled around with.

This is an essential Babes In Toyland record, if your a fan, it's a must have!

5-0 out of 5 stars why you should buy this album
in my humble opinion, Babes in toyland is the best 3 piece punk band ever, and i love to turn people on to them whenever i get the chance. while theres no such thing as a bad babes album, i would stongly recomend To Mother to anyone unfamiliar with their music as a good introduction to them.
the recordings have this great eerie echoing quality, that gives the melodic dischord a really solid feel, and with the exception of primus (which while sung by Lori, who did a stand up job on magic flute, dogg, and ragweed; comes across as sloppy) the albums tracks are expertley ordered, winding you up to bring you down to wind you up again.
i'd have to say that the best song here is Ripe, which is (to me at least) so heart-breakingly beautiful it borders on being emotionally exhausting if listened to too much. i think peoples biggest misconception about the Babes is that Kat's vocals are just a bunch of angry screaming, and i agree with kat when she said in an article that she's not so much angry as passionate.
Listening to To Mother you can hear a whole spectrum of emotion, her elemental howling carrying a sense of irony and loss, and her lyrics while at first glance could be considerd simplistic, have a cathartic bite that creeps up on you.
in the Babes i have found a well that never runs dry, and while they have been broken up for a while, i never get tired of their music. i hope that this inspires like minded people to give them a chance. i promise you wont be sorry for it.

p.s. if you like Babes in toyland, i urge you to check out Kats new band Katastrophy Wife....its not the babes, but definatley stands up in its own right.

5-0 out of 5 stars old but new
this e.p. and the album spanking machine are my favorites. for me they are a time when babes in toyland were in their prime...pure, raw, uninhibited genius...catatonic planet is probably my favorite track...and the instumental the quite room (i think it's called)....basically this e.p. just plain rocks...it's a classic... i know the sugar plum fairie her name is mary...mad pilot flies, into the mire...mad angels fly, they are my sky...you won't be disappionted. ... Read more


15. Tiger Beat
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Asin: B0000064AB
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 109216
Average Customer Review: 3.25 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Addictive grrrl rock
Always on the lookout for new CD's with real grrrl power (and not the spice girls kind either!)I reccently bought this CD and have not stoped listening to it since.

Really, the best way to describe it is the marrriage of Bikini Kill and the Go-go's not because they are unoriginal, but because of the popy sing-song hooks, and electric guitar riffs wailing over lyrics that are decidedly grrrl centered. Influenced by my particular school, I have reccently begun listening to a lot of music celebrating women in rock and punk bands.

Because the stereotype of the female groupie is so well worn, I thought it was interesting of the band to write and sing about the adventures of a male groupie.

Yes, I bought the album just out of curiousity, but I found out that it was impossible to just listen to it---dancing is an absolute must with this CD.

4-0 out of 5 stars very impressive debut album
olympia's bangs impress on their debut album, tiger beat. a melting pot of ac/dc, bangles, and maybe black sabbath if they weren't so dark and angry sounding. this album is intoxicatingly catchy, while rocking at the same time. with guitar solos that seem to go to outer space but come back at the right time. the nice thing about this album is that it is the perfect length. it ends leaving you wanting more, but knowing that if there were more songs at the end of the album you would be tired from rocking out to long. their new album sweet revenge is pretty good too.

1-0 out of 5 stars Sounds like...everything else...
We wanna be just like yew. To lame to create their own sound The Bangs are content with medocrity and the status quo. Don't waste your time, there are plenty of other Oly bands who are much more worthy than this second rate schlock. The only thing good about this band is their drummer Jesse Fox.

3-0 out of 5 stars Fun, Fury & Attitude!
What would you get if you combined Sleater-Kinney, Bikini Kill and the Go-Go's? The infectious punk-pop trio known as the Bangs. Their debut album, Tiger Beat is 10 tracks of fun, fury and attitude. Powered by drummer Jesse Fox, guitarist Sarah Utter and bassist Maggie Vail share vocal duties as they rip it up and spit it out on songs like "S.O.S." A sneer at the commercial manipulation of female stereotypes, "I don't want to be your pretty heartbreaker/But I know that I'll never be/That girl on your turntable/That girl on your t.v." They also kick out a hilarious homage to an ardent fan on "He's A Groupie," but have the humility to confess to being adoring fans themselves on "Death By Guitar." The Bangs are a relatively new and young band, but all members have extensive experience in the Olympia, Washington music scene. Utter (the Seductive, Witchy Poo) manages radio promotions for K Records, Vail (Bonnot Gang, the Slatternlies) maintains a day job as publicist for Kill Rock Stars and Fox sits behind the kit with Polecat. Olympia has established itself as a breeding ground for superior nouveau-punk bands and Tiger Beat is a stellar contribution to that legacy. ... Read more


16. Inzombia
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Asin: B000000JPZ
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 212195
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Inzombia Will Enchant You
Edgy but smooth, with infectious lyrics and melodies. If you even think you might be interested in Slant 6 this CD is where you should start. It won't leave your CD player for weeks. LadyBug Superfly and Victim of Your Own Desires are amazing tracks that will stick in your head forever. I still catch myself humming LadyBug in the shower, a few years after the first time I listened to it. The whole CD is a little on the dark side, it has a mesmerizing quality. If you like Grrl Groups that rock with great voices and intelligent lyrics, I promise you will love this CD. ... Read more


17. That's Not What I Heard
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Asin: B00004YWY7
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 34622
Average Customer Review: 4.71 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Restraint and polish have their virtues, but the Gossip's first full-length preaches a powerful sermon on the value of raw, honest emotion and reckless abandon. Part of the power of their message lies in the simplicity of its delivery. Limiting themselves to vocals, guitar, and drums, with absolutely no studio wizardry, first names only in liner notes, and a total running time of less than 25 minutes, this threesome has no tolerance for non-essentials. Guitarist Nathan and drummer Kathy lay down a stripped-down retro sound somewhat reminiscent of the Flat Duo Jets and Bratmobile, providing singer Beth with a perfect pulpit from which to deliver her frank discourses on lesbian love, lust, and leverage. Highlights include opener "Swing Low," the back-to-back "Where the Girls Are" and "Bring It On," and the closer, "Hott Date." While this CD's 14 tracks aren't incredibly diverse, they do pack a wallop, and fans of no-frills garage rock and raw, lo-fi blues should definitely give it a listen. --Steve Halloran ... Read more

Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars That southern rock makes me wanna jump up and boogie down!
The Gossip started a revival with this genre of music that was becoming scarce. When this album came out in the beginning of the year 2001, it is just what was needed in the world to wake everyone up. A lot of bands jumped on the bandwagon with this "new" sound. They are a three piece band consisting of merely a vocalist, guitarist and drummer. Some people say this album tends to drag in places, but I would say just the opposite. Beth Ditto has such a strong, sexy and bluesy voice, there is much to love about it. And their sound is pure garage/blues rock. The singer is openly gay, with very racy lyrics, which fit their sound perfectly. She turns what used to be just a church song, 'Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,' into a naughty song being sung to a bad girl; 'sweet baby/momma's baby/there's only one thing that can make you my lady/swing low, down low, sweet chariot.' Phew, makes me sweat. Long live the Gossip!

5-0 out of 5 stars Beth Ditto is unstoppable.
I'm usually a big fan of very carefully produced songs with intricate details. This is simply the opposite. It's raw, sweaty rock produced in someone's basement. Nothing is tweaked. It's just drums, a guitar and Beth Ditto's amazing voice wailing over it, pulling you under.

Before I actually heard The Gossip for the first time, I read dozens of articles about them. The critics had nothing but rave reviews. Once you hear this cd, though, none of that matters anymore. This music belongs to YOU. It pulses in you as if you were dancing with the rest of the crowd at the show, Beth's tremendous voice pulling at you. The simple, repeated verses of these songs are infectious and charming.

This is hot, lesbionic, Southern goodness. What more could you want?

5-0 out of 5 stars SWEEEEET!!!
i first heard The Gossip on Queercore TV, as u know the lead singer is a lesbian...from then on, i was hooked!!!! the simple, raw way they send their messages is amazing and the songs are perfect!!!!! also check out their other 2 cds, also very good!!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars This is GOOD music!
This is an awesome album for people that like good music. Beth has the strongest and most passionate voice ever! This album is so powerful and energetic that it makes you want to scream, dance, make out, and eat fried chicken all at the same time! You should totally buy this album! DO IT NOW!!!

4-0 out of 5 stars Short and Sweet
I was browsing in one of those music stores on St. Mark's in NYC, and they had this disc on. Talk about the anti-muzak. Raw and strangely classical punk. The songs burst through about two minutes or a minute and a half of powerful guitar and powerful singing. Quick and to the point with a definite emotional edge. I may not be a lesbian, but I can appreciate the angst. And the catchy tunes. ... Read more


18. Saddle the Bridge
list price: $12.98
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Asin: B00004SBXQ
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 69641
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding
Amazing CD. See if you can track down a copy, it is definetly worth your time.

4-0 out of 5 stars Chamber music for the indie-rock set
With cello, contrabass and drums, Bonfire Madigan appears to be a group of indie-rockers who never could shake the classical music training of their youth.

5-0 out of 5 stars amazing
this album is light years ahead of bonfire madigan's first album ("From the Burnpile"). i found that album to be somewhat lacking in terms of consistency and production. sure there were some great songs, but i got the sense that it was merely a collection of songs, not a full fledged album.

this new album though, is wonderfully consistent and cohesive. it really shows some maturity in song writing and arrangment for the group. on this album, the bonfire is pared down to it's core trio of madigan (cello, vocals), sheri (bass), and tomas (drums). much more attention has been paid to production and crafting a thematic album. striping things to the bone has allowed the musicians to focus on the most important thing, the music. though a little more spare than the previous album, it is no less enthralling.

the arrangement of the group, two strings (bass and cello), drums, and vocals is highly unique. the songs blend rock, folk, classical, pop, and even a touch of hip-hop influences. the result is intriguingly original instrumental arrangements, coupled with a compelling and powerful voice that has things to say. madigan's vocals are truly breathtaking and magnificent. the shear amount of energy that madigan pours into her music is stunning and quite captivating, you can tell that this is music she really believes in. that makes it impossible to ignore, and difficult not to share in her passion and conviction.

adding to the mix on this album is the way the group puts sound collage and studio created soundscapes to good use, both in rachel's song (and its variations) and in other spots, adding to the pacing and dynamics of the album. also great is the artwork, which in my opinion is much better than the previous album. all in all, this is one awe inspiring package: music, artwork, spirit, everything adds up to an exhilirating new experience, the likes of which i guarantee you've not heard before. ... Read more


19. Kaia
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Asin: B00000219N
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 134909
Average Customer Review: 4.67 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (3)

4-0 out of 5 stars Lovely
Kaia's self-titled solo album(she's the lead singer of the group the Butchies) is a simple, lovely acoustic folk effort. I still get the shivers when she sings "...these chairs...they hold me like I wish you would hold me" in "16," and the "I'm still waiting for you" part in "No Sides." Good stuff.

5-0 out of 5 stars Unspeakably Awesome
It has some of the most beautiful love/love lost songs. Great songwriting, a gorgeous voice and spot-on guitar. Very raw and perfect in an edgy way.

5-0 out of 5 stars Kaia is an awesome chick who keeps the mood light. Love her
Kaia is the greatest chick rocker next to Ani DiFranco ... Read more


20. Sweet Revenge
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Asin: B00004SBXO
Catlog: Music
Sales Rank: 104749
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (2)

4-0 out of 5 stars She-Bangs
On the post-riot-grrrl landscape, female-fronted punk bands range from the Sleater-Kinney camp, which merges perky cheerleader chants with adventurous art-rock, to the Donnas and their daughters, who churn out straight-forward rockers that attempt to make up for in spunk what they lack in substance. In the middle of this spectrum are Sleater-Kinney's Olympia, Washington neighbors The Bangs, who blend their hand-clapping go-go pop with infectious riffs reminiscent of Cheap Trick. (The group ends its sophomore album, Sweet Revenge, with a knowing cover of that band's "Southern Girls.") As a result, The Bangs are accessible without dumbing down their tunes, many of which are relatively complex with bass-driven breakdowns and searing solos. Lyrically, the group mixes its playful spirit with a more mature attitude, as on "Train Wreck," which begins with singer Sarah Utter delivering flirty come-ons, then slows down as she weighs the possible consequences of her impulsive actions. "Shick Shadel" matches a dark melodic undercurrent with appropriately downbeat lyrics (I tear my hair out watching her win/While I'm resigned as a distant friend), but the next song, "Licorice Whip," quickly re-establishes the record's peppy slumber-party feel. With Sweet Revenge, The Bangs balance the best of both worlds -- raw enough to remain genuine, but polished enough to demand respect.

4-0 out of 5 stars energetic, fresh power punk
A lot has been made of The Bangs' influences-they share a label (and occasionally tours) with established girl-punk icons Sleater-Kinney. While there may be some common characteristics, the two bands are fundamentally different. Sleater-Kinney are very political, exploring complex issues with their music. The Bangs share a similar "go get 'em" attitude, but their songs are more focused on teenage angst, relationships and just rocking out than they are on hot debates. This is fun music. The opening track illustrates this- it's entitled "Fast Easy Love," It's about forty-five seconds long, and contains the line "gimme fast, gimme easy, gimme NOW!" And that sums up what they give you over the course of the record - fast, immediate and catchy songs.The one slow burner, "undo everything," is a surprise in the middle of the album - slower and sadder, but lacking none of the energy and passion of the more rocking tracks. If you like this, a band with a similar spirit (and similar line-up of two girls and a boy) is the Rondelles. ... Read more


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